Category Archive: Uncategorized

  1. £2.1million boost for diagnostics at Kingston Hospital and HRCH

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    More vital tests, scans and checks will be provided to local patients thanks to a successful bid for £2.1million government funding.

    This funding will enable teams at Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare (HRCH) to deliver nearly 10,000 more physiological tests per year for cardiology and respiratory conditions. The money will enable Kingston Hospital to reconfigure and refurbish part of its existing outpatients service, to increase capacity and improve access for patients to these important diagnostic tests.

    This builds on previous successful bids to increase Kingston Hospital’s endoscopy and CT scanning capability, and introduce non-obstetric ultrasound at Teddington Memorial Hospital for over 5,000 scans per year (running alongside existing x-ray services, which provides direct access to walk-in and primary care patients).

    This is part of the Government’s focus on Community Diagnostic Centres, which are designed to speed up the diagnosis of conditions from cancer to heart to lung disease for all patients.

    Tracey Moore, Chief Operating Officer at Kingston Hospital, said: “I’m delighted we have made another successful bid to expand our diagnostic capability. This will mean more patients get the tests they need to get diagnosed and treated more efficiently.”

    Tom Penman, Assistant Director Clinical Services (Richmond and South West London) at HRCH, said: “This is fantastic news and builds on our ongoing work to deliver more vital tests and scans for our local communities, including ultrasound at Teddington Memorial Hospital.”

  2. Improving the hospital environment

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    This year we have continued with our ambitious building developments on the hospital site.

    In October, a new gynaecology outpatient building located at the hospital entrance on Galsworthy Road opened to patients. The new Willow Building is purpose-built for the Trust’s gynaecology service, which sees over 2,000 patients each month. Outpatient and procedure clinics now take place under one roof, benefiting patients and staff.

    Work to develop a three-story extension of the Bernard Meade Wing also began in October, coinciding with Kingston Hospital Charity reaching its revised £2m fundraising goal. Extending the Royal Eye Unit on the ground floor will create a dedicated area for the retinal service to treat the growing number of patients with age-related macular degeneration and other conditions that affect the back of the eye. Extending Sunshine Ward at first floor level will also create the space needed to develop a self-contained day oncology unit for children undergoing cancer treatment. This extension represents the second phase of works, following enhancements to the Royal Eye Unit’s acute referral centre last year.

    Work also recently started on site to build our new ENT (ear, nose and throat) and audiology outpatients department, located at the centre of the hospital site. The new single storey modular build will provide dedicated audiology consultation rooms, audiology booths, examination and procedure rooms, a hearing aid lab, and additional administration areas, improving the environment and experience for patients and staff. Work is due to be completed in early 2023.

    Further improvement works are also planned for the Sir William Rous Unit, the Emergency Department and our radiology services.

    To help make these improvements a reality for our patients, there may be some disruption to normal activities. If possible, patients and visitors are asked to use public transport or to be dropped off at the hospital, as traffic flow and car parking spaces are currently limited.

    If you are coming to hospital for an appointment, please only bring one person with you as waiting areas are under pressure at this time. Due to building works, space in waiting areas is particularly limited in the Emergency Department and the Royal Eye Unit.

    Thank you for your co-operation and apologies for any inconvenience.

  3. Immunisations webinar for parents

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    South West London NHS are hosting an online webinar for parents or carers of children aged 1 to 9 years old.

    Join us to hear more and get your questions about immunisations answered by local healthcare professionals. Also hear about Healthier Together, a brand new website, https://www.swlondon-healthiertogether.nhs.uk/, which provides trustworthy healthcare advice and directs you to the best care for your child.

    You can join us by using the link https://bit.ly/3sCK5LM or register in advance to receive the joining link via email https://bit.ly/3U3fse8

  4. Careers in health and care

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    Are you aged 14 or over and interested in a career in health and care?

    Find out more about some of the careers in our local area and the ways you can get involved with our hospital, in our short film:

  5. Maternity colleagues presented with Chief Midwifery Officer Silver Awards

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    This week, Regional Chief Midwife for London, Kate Brintworth, visited Kingston Hosptial’s Maternity Unit.

    Kate met with midwifery colleagues and on behalf of Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, Chief Midwifery Officer for England, presented Balvinder Reehal (Screening Lead) and Pippa Sparks (Sonographer) with Chief Midwifery Officer Silver Awards, in recognition of their work and dedication to the unit and to those who use Kingston Hospital’s maternity services.

    Congratulations to Balvinder and Pippa.  

  6. Kingston Hospital Charity marks Free Wills Month and thanks local resident for legacy gift

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    To mark Free Wills Month, Kingston Hospital Charity has teamed up with will-writing service Guardian Angel and local solicitors Lodge Brothers Legal Services, to offer an opportunity to write or update a simple will for free.

    A gift left by local resident, Karen Hindle, in her will, recently helped to fund a new garden and meeting space for staff at Kingston Hospital.

    Karen’s husband, Pete Wylie, said: “Karen drew up her first will when she turned 60, in 2016. There were no surprises. As a long-time volunteer dog walker and a donor to animal welfare charities, the will reflected her interests. We didn’t expect to have to change it at all. But four years later the pandemic hit, and legions of health workers fought for our lives. 

    “In September 2021, Karen got an unexpected cancer diagnosis. It was incurable but treatable, so the oncology teams at Kingston Hospital and the Royal Marsden went to work. Unfortunately, the melanoma had already swept through her body. The treatment weakened her so much she contracted a serious pneumonia which landed her in Kingston Hospital for two weeks. Though she recovered, the oncologists told us her body couldn’t take any more treatment. The respiratory team worked with the palliative care team who liaised with the discharge team and Karen was home for Christmas.

    “Karen realised that knowing you’re dying changes everything. Those pension plans? That will? They can become a potent force for good. In the three months left to her Karen reviewed it all and with her recent experiences still fresh, she wanted to find a way to help improve the working lives of the hospital staff, even by a little bit.

    “We had both heard about the work of Kingston Hospital Charity. She didn’t want her money to go on a clinical building or machinery. She wanted to invest in the wellbeing of those people who worked to save her. Karen exhumed the old will and re-directed money to Kingston Hospital Charity. I am sure she would be pleased knowing that her gift has helped to provide a new garden and meeting area for staff.”

    Rob Aldous, Director of Kingston Hospital Charity, said: “Those that leave gifts in their wills are very often grateful patients, like Karen, who want to show their gratitude for the care they receive. My thanks go to Karen and her family, and to all who leave a gift in their will in support of our hospital. Gifts in wills are a significant source of support for Kingston Hospital Charity and help us to enhance care in many different ways for the benefit of patients now and in the future.

    “There is no obligation to leave a gift to Kingston Hospital Charity when using our free will services, but, after taking care of loved ones, any gift you do decide to make will be greatly appreciated.”

    For more information, please visit www.khc.org.uk

  7. Help us to improve stroke care

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    This Trust will soon be taking part in a national survey to find out what patients think about their stroke care.

    All NHS stroke patients who received treatment and/or therapy between 16/05/22 and 16/09/22 will receive a copy of the survey.

     This is part of a national programme to improve stroke patients’ experiences.

    Taking part is voluntary

    The survey will be carried out by an independent company, under a signed agreement with NHS England in partnership with the Stroke Association.

    Section 251 support has been recommended by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care following advice from the Confidentiality Advisory Group (CAG), who are an independent advisory group which includes lay representation. This allows Trusts to share your details without your consent.

    Regulation 5 of the 2002 Control of Patient Information Regulations provides a lawful basis for confidential patient information to be processed for medical purposes. If you have opted out via the National Data Opt Out, your information will not be disclosed by your Trust.

    For more information please see the poster here.

  8. Kingston Hospital hosts heart education event for local students

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    On Wednesday 12 October, Kingston Hospital welcomed a group of Year 9 and Year 10 students from Chessington School, to a ‘Your Heart Hospital’ event.

    The Your Heart Hospital initiative is supported by the British Cardiovascular Society and is a nationwide event involving NHS Trusts across the country. 

    Hosted by consultant cardiologists Dr Tapesh Pakrashi and Dr Simon Pearse, the programme aims to support local school pupils to understand more about heart disease and the cardiology services run by Kingston Hospital, as well as teaching resuscitation skills, and providing insight into careers in health and care. Talks and demonstrations were given by members of staff from across the hospital, ranging from doctors and physiologists, to nurses, resuscitation officers, and physician associates.

    Students were given the opportunity to learn more about each of the roles that play a part in caring for cardiology patients with heart rhythm problems and treating heart attack patients, as well as hearing about wide-ranging career pathways and opportunities for working within the NHS.

  9. Maternity services receive Ockenden assurance visit

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    NHS England’s regional maternity team recently visited Kingston Hospital’s maternity services to provide assurance against the 7 immediate and essential actions from the interim Ockenden report (December 2020).

    Kingston Hospital’s maternity services have met all the requirements arising from the report. An overview of findings of the latest regional Ockenden assurance visit can be viewed here.

  10. New staff garden and meeting space officially open

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    A new garden and meeting space for staff was officially opened at Kingston Hospital at the start of October, by Chair of Kingston Hospital and HRCH, Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs.

    The renovations were funded by Kingston Hospital Charity and made possible thanks to the generosity of The Friends of Kingston Hospital, The London Full Gospel Church in Raynes Park, The Victoria Foundation and a gift kindly left by Karen Hindle in her will.

    Sukhvinder was joined by Jo Farrar, some of the charity’s supporters, and colleagues from across the hospital’s Health and Wellbeing Committee, to celebrate the opening.

    Nic Kane, Chief Nurse and Chair of Kingston Hospital’s Health and Wellbeing Committee, said: “The wellbeing of our staff is really important to us here at Kingston Hospital. In response to what we have been hearing from colleagues around the value of having more meeting spaces and places to get together and to take their breaks, we are pleased to have been able to officially open this relaxing and accessible outdoor space. Thank you to Kingston Hospital Charity and to those who have so generously contributed to the project, for making this wonderful new garden possible.”  

  11. October is breast cancer awareness month

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    What is breast cancer?

    Breast cancer is cancer that starts in the breast tissue.

    One in seven women in the UK will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. 

    Each year, about 55,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK. It is more common in women who are aged 50 and over.

    Men can also  get breast cancer. The most common symptom of breast cancer in men is a lump in the chest area.

    Breast cancer in men is very rare. Around 370 men are diagnosed each year in the UK.

    Breast cancer can cause symptoms such as a lump, but a lump is not the only symptom of breast cancer.

    To find further facts and information about breast cancer go to

    What is breast cancer? (breastcancernow.org)

    Breast cancer | Cancer Research UK

    Breast cancer | Macmillan Cancer Support

    See your GP if you notice a change

    Most breast changes, including breast lumps, are not cancer. But the sooner breast cancer is found, the more successful treatment is likely to be.  

    Get any new or unusual changes checked by a GP. 

    The Macmillan information centre is based in the Sir William Rous unit at Kingston hospital

    Please call 0208 973 5001 or drop in if you have any worries or questions

  12. Nurse led pulmonary nodule service wins national patient experience award

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    Kingston Hospital’s lung (pulmonary) nodule service lead, Candice Stephenson, was presented with the ‘Fiona Littledale’ award at the Patient Experience Network National Awards (PENNA) which took place on Wednesday 28 September.

    The PENNA awards recognise best practice in patient experience across health and social care in the UK and the ‘Fiona Littledale’ award celebrates an oncology nurse who has demonstrated personal commitment to developing skills and understanding in their field. Kingston Hospital’s nurse led pulmonary nodule service was also shortlisted for the ‘Cancer Experience of Care’ award.

  13. Dermatology nursing team awarded ‘Team of the Year’

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    This month, Kingston Hospital’s dermatology nursing team were awarded ‘Team of the Year’ for 2022, at the British Dermatological Nursing Group’s annual awards, which took place in Harrogate.

    The award was introduced in 2008 to celebrate teamwork among dermatology nursing colleagues across the country and Kingston’s team were presented with the award for their exemplary advanced nursing practice. Congratulations to the dermatology nursing team.

  14. Royal Eye Unit consultants perform life changing surgeries in Bangladesh

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    This summer, Dr Haque and Mr Sherafat, consultants in Kingston Hospital’s Royal Eye Unit, visited Bangladesh in their spare time, to perform life changing cataract surgery for some of the poorest people in the country. Approximately 90% of the population in Bangladesh live in rural areas, with no facilities for cataract operations.

    Supported by the Global Aid Trust, Mr Sherafat and Dr Haque performed 146 cataract operations during their visit.

    Dr Haque said: “Being a trustee and the current chair of Global Aid Trust I feel proud to do such a brilliant job. Our next target is to establish rural eye hospitals in different parts of the country in the future to prevent and cure blindness.”

    Mr Sherafat said: “The experience is truly humbling and a reminder of the very many uncompromising, often elementary standards that we have grown to expect and take for granted in the Western world and we should remain grateful for. These are infinitely rewarding and enlightening experiences and one of the most exciting periods of the year, which I plan and look forward to with great anticipation and some trepidation. Now that we have hopefully put COVID behind us, we can do these trips more regularly.”

  15. New paediatric garden officially opened by CBBC star

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    Patients, families, and staff at Kingston Hospital were joined by special guest Kimberly Wyatt, star of CBBC series Almost Never and ITV’s Dancing on Ice, to celebrate the official opening of a new paediatric garden, made possible thanks to charity funding.

    The garden has been transformed to provide a bright and accessible outdoor space for young patients receiving treatment at the hospital.

    The garden’s renovations were funded by Kingston Hospital Charity, thanks to the generosity of their donors and fundraisers, and with support from The Friends of Kingston Hospital, Tom and Sheila Springer Charity, and Optima Medical Ltd.

    Kimberly Wyatt joined Kingston Hospital’s Chief Nurse, Nic Kane, to cut the ribbon and to officially declare the garden open.

    Julie Morris, Play Specialist on Kingston Hospital’s paediatric ward, said: “The newly renovated garden will make a real difference to the children, young people and families who come to Sunshine ward. It has given us a fantastic new space for play and relaxation. Thank you to everyone who has helped to make this project possible – we are so grateful for your support.”

  16. Bank holiday services, Monday 19 September

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    Due to the funeral of Her Majesty The Queen, Monday has been declared a national bank holiday.

    As is usual for a bank holiday, urgent and emergency services will continue to run from Kingston Hospital. Some planned appointments and surgery will be postponed.

    If you are due to come into Kingston Hospital on Monday, if we haven’t already been in touch, we will contact you if your appointment needs to be re-scheduled.

    Thank you.

  17. Korean Arts Festival raises funds for Kingston Hospital Charity

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    On Sunday 4 September, the Korean Culture & Arts Centre presented a Korean Arts Festival at the Rose Theatre in Kingston, with proceeds from the event donated to Kingston Hospital Charity. During the performance, a certificate was presented to the Korean UK Nurses Association (KUNA) represented by a group of nurses from Kingston Hospital, in appreciation of their dedicated work during the COVID pandemic.

    Since the start of the pandemic the wider Korean community, including Korean Senior Citizens UK, Korean Residents Society, London Full Gospel Church and the Korean Chamber of Commerce have donated over £75,000 in support of Kingston Hospital, and this is the second consecutive year that the Rose Theatre has hosted a performance of traditional Korean music and dance to raise funds for Kingston Hospital Charity.

    Jo Farrar, Chief Executive of Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare, attended the event to thank the Korean community for their generosity and continued support.

  18. Kingston Hospital awarded for commitment to patient safety by NJR for third consecutive year

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    Kingston Hospital has been named as a National Joint Registry (NJR) Quality Data Provider for the third year running, following the successful completion of a national programme of local data audits.

    The NJR monitors the performance of hip, knee, ankle, elbow, and shoulder joint replacement operations to improve clinical outcomes primarily for the benefit of patients, but also to support orthopaedic clinicians and industry manufacturers. The registry collects high quality orthopaedic data in order to provide evidence to support patient safety, standards in quality of care, and overall cost-effectiveness in joint replacement surgery.

    The ‘NJR Quality Data Provider’ certificate scheme was introduced to offer hospitals a blueprint for reaching high quality standards relating to patient safety and to reward those who have met registry targets.

    In order to achieve the award, hospitals are required to meet a series of six ambitious targets during the audit period 2021/22.

    The NJR Data Quality Audit investigates the accurate number of joint replacement procedures submitted to the registry compared to the number carried out and recorded in the local hospital Patient Administration System. The audit ensures that the NJR is collecting and reporting upon the most complete, accurate data possible across all hospitals performing joint replacement operations, including Kingston Hospital.

    Sarah Joseph, Matron for Trauma and Orthopaedics at Kingston Hospital, commented: “We are delighted to have been named as a National Joint Registry Quality Data Provider, for the third year running. The award is a testament to our commitment to patient safety here at Kingston Hospital, and I would like to congratulate the team of staff who have been involved in this work.”

    National Joint Registry Medical Director, Mr Tim Wilton, said: “Congratulations to colleagues at Kingston Hospital. The Quality Data Provider Award demonstrates the high standards being met towards ensuring compliance with the NJR and is often a reflection of strong departmental efforts to achieve such status. Registry data provides an important source of evidence for regulators, such as the Care Quality Commission, to inform their judgements about services, as well as being a fundamental driver to inform improved quality of care for patients.”

    Further information about the NJR’s Quality Data Provider certificate scheme can be found online at: https://www.njrcentre.org.uk

  19. Kingston Hospital holding virtual AGM and Annual Members’ Meeting

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    Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is holding its Annual General Meeting (AGM) and Annual Members’ Meeting on Thursday 22 September 2022 at 6pm.

    The event will be held virtually as a Microsoft Teams meeting and members of the public are welcome to join.

    The meeting will chart Kingston Hospital’s achievements and focuses of the last year and will include information about our forward plans. Find out more.

  20. UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Award unveiled at Kingston Hospital

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    Doreen Mundy, Kingston Hospital’s first infant feeding lead, and Richard Wilson, the Trust’s first paediatric consultant, recently visited Kingston Hospital to officially unveil the maternity unit’s UNICEF UK Baby Friendly award.

    Kingston Hospital was awarded the prestigious Baby Friendly Award from the UK Committee for UNICEF (UNICEF UK), last year.

    “This award from the UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative is a reflection of our ongoing commitment to increase breastfeeding rates and improve care for all mothers at Kingston Hospital. We set out to ensure that all mothers and babies are supported to form a close and loving relationship – whatever their choice of feeding method – as this is the best start for every baby” said Kingston Hospital’s Infant Feeding Lead, Breda Murphy.

    The Baby Friendly Initiative is a global programme which aims to transform healthcare for babies, their mothers and families as part of a wider global partnership between UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO). In the UK, the Baby Friendly Initiative works with public services to better support families with feeding and developing close, loving relationships in order to ensure that all babies get the best possible start in life. The award is given to hospitals after an assessment by a UNICEF UK team has shown that recognised best practice standards are in place.

  21. South Asian Heritage Month – Santi’s story

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    One in 20 of us can trace back our heritage to South Asia. To celebrate South Asian Heritage Month, an opportunity to commemorate, mark and celebrate South Asian cultures, histories and communities, we have invited staff with South Asian backgrounds to share their stories.

    Santi Pokar, Red Bag Co-ordinator at Kingston Hospital, was born and grew up in Malaysia.

    Read Santi’s story.

  22. Kingston Hospital Launches Patient Portal

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    Going forward, when patients have an Outpatient appointment scheduled at Kingston Hospital they will receive a text, inviting them to register for the hospital’s new Patient Portal.  

    Kingston Hospital’s Patient Portal will provide time saving functionality for patients, with quick and secure digital access to their appointments at the Trust, in one place, listed chronologically.  

    Kingston Hospital has created a range of Patient support and resources for Patient Portal, including an explainer video, seen above 

    Available for all patients over the age of 16, Patient Portal can be accessed 24/7 via a mobile, tablet or computer, giving patients quick and secure access to view their appointments, appointment letters, clinic letters, discharge summaries, healthcare record, recorded allergies, pre-treatment questionnaires and messages from their healthcare team. 

    As the portal roll-out continues, patients will also be able to reschedule appointments (where appropriate), view test results and look at records of past procedures empowering patients to manage their care, and potentially providing time savings. Patients will also have the option to login via the NHS App.  

    Chief Executive, Jo Farrar, said: “As part of our Patient First Strategy we are continually looking at digital advances that create new opportunities to further improve care to local people.  

    “Kingston Hospital’s Patient Portal provides our patients with completely secure 24/7 access to view their upcoming appointments at the hospital, with exciting new functionality, including access via the NHS App to be added in the coming months. Technology is a valuable tool in healthcare, and we are proud to be able to offer this digital system to our patients.” 

    Local GP, Dr Annette Pautz said “Kingston Hospital’s Patient Portal will be a fantastic asset for our patients in the area, giving them the power to log in and check on details of upcoming treatments and appointment details, whenever they choose. The added benefit of an online platform, is that it is both secure, eliminating the risk of lost paperwork, and fast, meaning you can receive details of your appointment when it is scheduled, without having to wait for a letter to arrive in the post.”  

    To find out more about Kingston Hospital’s Patient Portal, including helpful videos and FAQ’s, visit www.kingstonhospital.nhs.uk/patient-portal

  23. Deputy Chief Executive appointed for Kingston Hospital and HRCH

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    Following a formal recruitment and selection process, Thom Lafferty has been appointed as Deputy Chief Executive for Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare (HRCH).

    Thom is currently Director of Strategy and Performance at Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust – a role he has been in since October 2018, having joined the Trust as Director of Corporate Affairs in January 2017.

    Previously, Thom was Director of Corporate and Legal Affairs at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and prior to that, has held similar roles at other NHS Trusts.

    Thom says: “It will be a great privilege to join Kingston Hospital and HRCH as Deputy Chief Executive. Both Trusts have excellent reputations, and I am particularly excited to be joining two organisations that place such an emphasis on clinical transformation and staff wellbeing.”

    Thom will be joining Kingston Hospital and HRCH at the end of November.

  24. Developing our objectives for the year ahead

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    As we continue to work in a more integrated way across Kingston Hospital, Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare, and Your Healthcare, we have been engaging with partners on a set of shared objectives for the year ahead.

    We would like to invite members of the public to let us know if these objectives are in line with where our focus should be.

    You can read the objectives and share your views in our short online form: https://form.jotform.com/221633972696366

    Your feedback is important to us – thank you for getting involved.

  25. RHS praise staff efforts

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    The judges from RHS Wisley praised the creativity of the garden planters given to us last year by the Royal Horticultural Society. The planters looked after by staff from different departments are located around the hospital site. Spending time in green space or bringing nature into your everyday life can benefit both your mental and physical wellbeing.

    Everyone’s planter was a winner. Congratulations to all.

    Awards were given as follows:

    Best involvement of the department and patients:

    Patient Safety and Risk

    Most changed and improved planter: Theatres and Anaesthetics

    Overall winner: Audiology (awarded by Chair Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs)

    Best teamwork: Physiotherapy

    Best choice of plants (Right Plant in the Right Place award):

    Emergency Department

    Most colourful: Speech and Language Therapy

    Best theme: Wolverton Centre

    Best decorated: Colposcopy and OT

    Most innovative (for coping with vandalised planter and thriving despite being based on a different site): Pain Clinic

    The planters are located around the hospital. To navigate your way round the planters, a map is attached.

  26. Visiting during the heatwave

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    If you are coming in to visit a patient in Kingston Hospital during the current heatwave, it is recommended that you visit during the cooler parts of the day. This will help us to reduce footfall in the hospital which will help to keep you and our patients safe. In line with the hospital’s heatwave procedures, you are asked to limit visits to either 12-1pm, or 6-8pm.

    Compassionate visiting will continue as normal during the heatwave. This includes visiting people receiving end of life care, people with dementia or a learning disability or those with complex mental health needs.

    Thank you for your support.

  27. Heatwave: how to cope in hot weather

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    Most of us welcome hot weather, but when it’s too hot for too long, there are health risks. 

    With temperatures due to soar over the weekend and into next week, south west Londoners are being urged to stay safe in the sun and look out for each other.

    Thousands of people end up in hospital each year because of heat, with conditions including severe sunburn, heat exhaustion and sun and heatstroke.

    Getting out and about in the hot weather can also trigger allergies, with some people admitted to hospital due to the effects of pollen or being stung by wasps, hornets, and other insects.

    The risk of serious illness is much higher for the older people, children and young people, and those who already have health conditions, including heart and breathing problems. Which is why it’s important to check on neighbours and older people relatives while the temperature remains high.

    Advice on how to reduce the risk either for yourself or somebody you know is available on the NHS website (www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/heatwave-how-to-cope-in-hot-weather)

    Those with less serious conditions are encouraged to ‘talk before they walk’, by getting advice from the free NHS 111 phone and online service to check symptoms and decide on the best course of action.

    People with minor injuries or mild conditions which can be better dealt with at home or with over-the-counter remedies and advice from community pharmacists are reminded not to go to A&E and call NHS 111 if they are unsure.

  28. AHP colleagues attend Chessington School careers fair

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    Earlier this week, a team of allied health professionals (AHPs) from Kingston Hospital attended a careers fair at Chessington School. The team shared interactive displays, activities and information with students, to spread the word about careers in the NHS and in the allied health professions.

    Find out more about the role of AHPs in the NHS: https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/we-are-the-nhs/allied-health-professionals

  29. Level 3 Heatwave alert – stay safe in the hot weather

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    The Met Office has issued a Level 3 Heatwave warning due to the high temperatures expected all this week (11-17 July 2022) and possibly into the following week.

    Why is a heatwave a problem?

    The main risks posed by a heatwave are: 

    • not drinking enough water (dehydration) 
    • overheating, which can make symptoms worse for people who already have problems with their heart or breathing
    • heat exhaustion and heatstroke

    Who’s most at risk?

    A heatwave can affect anyone, but the most vulnerable people are:

    • older people – especially those over 75
    • those who live on their own or in a care home
    • people who have a serious or long term illness – including heart or lung conditions, diabetes, kidney disease, Parkinson’s disease or some mental health conditions
    • those who may find it hard to keep cool – babies and the very young, the bed bound, those with drug or alcohol addictions or with Alzheimer’s disease
    • people who spend a lot of time outside or in hot places – those who live in a top floor flat, the homeless or those whose jobs are outside

    Tips for coping in hot weather

    • look out for those who may struggle to keep themselves cool and hydrated – older people, those with underlying health conditions and those who live alone are particularly at risk
    • stay cool indoors – many of us will need to stay safe at home this summer so know how to keep your home cool
    • close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors
    • drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol
    • never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle, especially infants, young children or animals
    • try to keep out of the sun between 11am to 3pm
    • walk in the shade, apply sunscreen regularly and wear a wide brimmed hat, if you have to go out in the heat
    • avoid exercising in the hottest parts of the day

    For more information visit the NHS website.

  30. Launching electronic whiteboards on hospital wards

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    Thanks to funding from Kingston Hospital Charity, all adult inpatient wards across Kingston Hospital will soon have electronic patient whiteboards in place, to support the improvement of ward processes.

    The team on Derwent Ward have successfully completed a one-month pilot of the new Cerner electronic patient whiteboard and have started the journey towards implementing fully electronic ward processes. The whole multi-disciplinary team including nursing, medical, therapies, pharmacy, administrative, and discharge coordinator colleagues have been part of the innovation.

    The whiteboards update automatically and display all patient information in a clear format. The system also allows for actions to be allocated to specific team members and viewed remotely by other departments to prevent duplication of information and to streamline communication between hospital staff.

    Rollout of the whiteboards across additional wards will follow over the coming months.

  31. For quick health advice, visit your local pharmacist

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    As qualified health professionals your local pharmacist offers a wide range of services. For example, NHS services such as health checks and vaccinations or private services such as travel vaccinations.

    For a full list of services and details of where to find your local pharmacy, search ‘NHS find a
    pharmacy’
    .

  32. A true passion for Occupational Therapy – from treating snake bites in rural South Africa, to leading our Inpatient OT team

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    A true passion for Occupational Therapy – from treating snake bites in rural South Africa, to leading our Inpatient OT team

    From life in South Africa to moving to the UK, Sarah talks about her experiences as an Occupational Therapist (OT) and Inpatient OT Lead at Kingston Hospital and why she is so passionate about the profession.

    “I was born and grew up in Durban on the East Coast of South Africa. It can be incredibly humid and hot there. It’s rainy in the winter but has beautiful summers. My parents still live in Durban, and I have two sisters – both of whom have recently relocated to the UK. I’m part South African and have a Mauritian mother, so I’ve got a bit of French in me too!”

    “Part of the reason why I love occupational therapy is looking at a person not only medically, but in terms of how they are set up socially and in the environments that they spend time in.”

    Before moving to the UK nine years ago, Sarah worked for a number of years in South Africa. She says: “I started my career in a rural placement in Port Shepstone, because in South Africa you have to do community service as a health professional. It was a rural district hospital which didn’t have a working x-ray machine. We held clinics in very rural towns, and we used to drive to places that I didn’t even know existed.”

    “Once I was given a live chicken as a thank you from a patient at one of our clinics! That was the best gift ever.”

    “At our clinics, we had a doctor, an OT and then either the speech and language therapist or a physio. The OTs used to run paediatric and stroke groups under the trees and we saw a lot of hand injuries as a result of snake bites. These were treated with fasciotomies which resulted in a lot of scarring and difficulty with movement in the hands. We used to run a hands group, where we supported patients with exercises and showed them how to manage the development of scars. Many people worked in farming, or had to farm for a food source, so it was really important to be able to use their hands.”

    “In South Africa, we also made sensory toys from anything old. We used to make balls out of rocks, sand and plastic bags, so the children could play soccer. As well as working in the rural clinics, I worked in acute inpatient care in hospitals, a rehabilitation centre, a school, vocational assessments, and private paediatrics. In the UK, I’ve worked at a few different hospitals, in both the private and public sector. I have had the privilege of working in palliative care, care of the elderly, neonatal ITU, paediatric neurology and paediatric oncology.”

    When asked about her role, Sarah says: “I love my job – being an Occupational Therapist means everything to me. It’s a very different kind of occupational therapy in the UK, so that took some time to get used to. In South Africa, we had to be more creative with problem solving and equipment provision, while the NHS has so many specialist areas and resources. I also enjoy the NHS team approach to healthcare and working in the NHS has given me the opportunity to learn new sets of skills.”

    “For me it’s about being able to make a change, and to fly the OT flag. I think Kingston has provided me the opportunity to really be able to do that in terms of what my vision for occupational therapy is and my passion for it. I just absolutely love being an OT and like the uniform, my blood is green.”

    Explaining how her journey to becoming an OT all started, Sarah explains: “I did a four-year undergrad BSc Hons in occupational therapy, straight out of school. I was thinking of becoming a physiotherapist but enjoyed the varied and individualised approach of OT more.”

    “I feel like it’s the ‘Mary Poppins’ of jobs, as it has incredible potential and we can do amazing things like whip lampshades out of bags, but nobody knows about it. I think physiotherapy and occupational therapy are often amalgamated in certain healthcare settings because of some of the work we do, but it’s a bit like having an electrician and a plumber – you need both to keep your house functioning.”

    An avid beach walker and a fan of ice cream and coffee, Sarah tells us what it is that keeps her going: “I think there’s a variety of things. I absolutely love people more than anything else – I love their complexity, and their experiences. I love the relationships that I have with my friends, my family, and the people that I’m really close with. I love being able to see them and just being a part of their day to day lives.”

  33. Teams shortlisted for national NHS Parliamentary Awards

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    Kingston Hospital’s Acute Emergency Department (ED) Frailty team and the Kingston and Richmond Proactive Anticipatory Care (PAC) Programme team have been shortlisted in the national NHS Parliamentary Awards.

    The Acute ED Frailty team is a multi-disciplinary team primarily based within Kingston Hospital’s Emergency Department and Clinical Decision Unit. The team works in the background, ensuring elderly patients are fully assessed and safe to be discharged, and preventing admissions by making sure support is available. The team includes a Geriatrician, SpR Frailty Registrar, Frailty Nurse Consultant, Frailty Nurse Practitioner, Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists and Pharmacist. Between 77% and 90% of patients seen by the frailty team at Kingston Hospital are discharged home, which alleviates pressure on the whole hospital system, by reducing the risks associated with acute admission of older people with frailty, which include deconditioning, delirium, increased mortality, and long lengths of stay. The Acute ED Frailty team were nominated by Sarah Olney MP and have been shortlisted for the ‘Excellence in Urgent and Emergency Care Award’.

    The Proactive Anticipatory Care (PAC) Model has been developed in conjunction with system partners across Kingston and Richmond in response to increased demand across health and social care. The MDT-focused model improves the identification and support of people with rising health and social care risks and complexities. PAC aims to improve the lives of patients by utilising a patient-centred approach and enabling professionals to work collaboratively towards a shared goal – the goal is to support people to stay at home longer and feel more resilient. The PAC team were nominated by Rt Hon Sir Ed Davey MP and Sarah Olney MP and have been shortlisted for the ‘Future NHS Award’.

    Winners of the NHS Parliamentary Awards will be announced at an awards ceremony taking place on Wednesday 6 July.

  34. Survey: Maternity services in South West London

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    Have you had recent experience of maternity services in South West London? We would love to hear from you.

    Share your views on using online information and digital records during your pregnancy, in this short survey.

    Your feedback will help shape the future strategy for use of digital technology in maternity services, at Kingston Hospital and other NHS Trusts in South West London.

  35. Join Kingston Hospital Charity for a Night to Remember

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    Kingston Hospital Charity is calling on the local community to raise funds to support bereaved families at Kingston Hospital, by taking part in their Night to Remember event this Autumn.

    The event, which is taking place on Saturday 1 October, is Kingston Hospital Charity’s first memory walk, providing an opportunity for family, friends, and colleagues to come together and celebrate the lives of loved ones, whilst walking a route of five miles or 15 miles, starting and finishing at the Market Place in Kingston.

    Proceeds from the sponsored walk will help Kingston Hospital to expand its support for bereaved families.

    Husband and wife, Garett and Alison Farrell, from Wimbledon will be taking part in a Night to Remember along with their eight-month-old son Axel, in memory of their first child, Finn.

    Alison said: “Our first baby, Finn, was born sleeping in August 2020 after a cord accident at 20 weeks. Words cannot describe our grief and how hard it was to give birth to and say goodbye to our little boy all in the space of a few dreadful days. Thankfully we were in the amazing hands of the Kingston Maternity Unit team in the purpose-built Daisy Room, which made this incredibly hard time bearable and gave us a chance to say a proper goodbye.

    “Since then, we have been blessed with a second son, Axel (middle name Finn), and again the wonderful people of Kingston Maternity Unit carried us through the worries of this pregnancy with extra special care. We’re forever indebted to them for the support they gave us that means we’re here today as a happy family unit. We will be taking part in a Night to Remember for our darling Finn, but also for all the other babies and families affected by loss who are never forgotten.”

    Clinical psychologist and Founder and CEO of the Loss Foundation, Dr Erin Hope Thompson MBE, provides support to bereaved families at Kingston Hospital’s maternity unit. 

    A £100 donation or sponsorship raised for Kingston Hospital Charity, funds one session with Erin for a bereaved family.

    Erin said: “The money raised from a Night to Remember will go towards providing bereavement support to families who experience the death of a baby during pregnancy or shortly after birth. I have been providing support to families who have experienced baby loss for nearly three years and have witnessed how vital this support is during such a difficult time. 

    “Experiencing the death of a child is life altering, and not having support in place can be hugely isolating and can put people at risk of further mental health struggles. It is my privilege to provide a space for people to talk, to get support, to keep connection to their baby, and to manage anxiety around future pregnancies. Thank you for taking part in a Night to Remember and helping us to continue to support people during the most difficult times in their lives.”

    Registration for the event costs £20 for adults and £10 for children, and each participant will receive a t-shirt and a medal.

    For more information or to sign up, visit www.khc.org.uk/events/nighttoremember/ or contact Fundraising Manager, Tracey Shaw – email tracey.shaw17@nhs.net or call 020 8973 5040.

  36. Volunteer falls project recognised by British Geriatrics Society

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    Kingston Hospital’s falls prevention community exercise programme has been selected to be showcased at the British Geriatrics Society’s Frailty and Urgent Care conference in July.

    The programme has been set up to help elderly residents across Kingston and Richmond to maintain their independence by matching trained volunteers to people who need support to complete exercises following a fall or injury.

    Falls are one of the biggest issues resulting in hospital admission in Kingston and Richmond boroughs and this programme, run alongside Helpforce charity, who work with healthcare organisations to increase volunteering opportunities, is already leading to improved outcomes.

    Through this initiative, launched in October 2021, volunteers can spend up to 8 weeks supporting patients at home by helping them to complete their exercises safely. With many of these people living alone, as well as the practical support the programme offers, patients have spoken positively about the social and emotional benefits of having regular contact with someone.

    Find out more about volunteering at Kingston Hospital.

  37. Temporary closure of main entrance – Saturday 2 July and Sunday 3 July

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    This weekend, we will be carrying out routine cleaning of the external canopy, outside the hospital’s main entrance. To ensure the health and safety of our patients, visitors and staff, the main entrance will be closed between the hours of 7am and 5pm on Saturday 2 July and Sunday 3 July.

    The main reception desk and Costa Coffee will remain open. To access the hospital during these hours, please use the Outpatients entrance. View a map of the hospital.

    Any vehicles arriving at the main entrance will be diverted to an alternative entrance.

  38. Tell us about your experience of mental health services in South West London

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    The NHS in South West London is developing a new three-year all-age mental health strategy and we want your views.

    We want to hear from a range of people to make sure the strategy reflects what matters most to people who use our services, the people who care for them, and our residents.

    We want to ensure that everyone at risk of developing a mental health condition can get help early, and in a way that works for them. We want to build on the best of our current services so we can provide high quality, accessible mental health and wellbeing services across our boroughs.

    This survey asks about your experiences of mental health services, how you look after your mental wellbeing, and your ideas about how things could be better.

    Everyone that completes the survey can choose to take part in a prize draw to win a £50 shopping voucher.

    The survey is open until 31 July 2022.

    Click here to take the survey.

  39. Plan ahead for appointments – significant travel disruption expected next week

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    With strikes planned on Transport for London’s transport network and on national rail services next week, patients are encouraged to plan ahead for appointments.

    In addition to significant disruption to rail travel from Tuesday 21 June to Sunday 26 June, there is likely to be more traffic on the roads and car parks may be busier than usual, so we would recommend travelling to the hospital by alternative means, if possible.

    For up-to-date information about planned strikes, visit the TfL website.

  40. Sharing insight into the importance of reasonable adjustments for patients with learning disabilities

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    This month, Gracie Holt, Kingston Hospital’s Learning Disability Liaison Practitioner, was approached by the NHS England Learning Disability and Autism Programme to be involved in a short film which aims to inform healthcare professionals and families about the importance of reasonable adjustments. Find out more and watch the film.

    The film was shared at a two-day national healthcare conference run by NHS Confederation, NHS England and NHS Improvement. Gracie was also invited to join a panel of guest speakers for a Q&A session at the conference, which took place in Liverpool on Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 June.

  41. Healthy living in Richmond

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    Eating healthy, staying active, and our overall lifestyle can have a significant impact on our physical health and wellbeing, but these behaviours can be hard to maintain. Have you ever tried to improve your lifestyle? What were the biggest barriers? What helped you?

    Whether you are happy about your current lifestyle, or feel like it could be improved, we want to hear from you! Tell Healthwatch Richmond what services you need to help you lead a healthy life. Your answers will help to shape services in Richmond.

    Take part in our survey: https://forms.gle/YY5TyADDr3aDCT5i7

    Find out more at https://www.healthwatchrichmond.co.uk/news/2022-04-01/healthy-lifestyle-research-take-part

  42. Physiotherapist recognised for service to the NHS during COVID-19

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    Rachel Perry, Physiotherapist at Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, has been awarded a British Empire Medal by The Queen, for her service to the NHS during COVID-19.

    Rachel was nominated by a patient who was cared for by her when Rachel and her physiotherapy colleagues were redeployed in early 2020, to support with non-invasive ventilation for patients on Kingston Hospital’s high dependency unit.

    Rachel was recognised in The Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2022, published in June to mark the contributions and service of people across the United Kingdom.

    Chief Executive, Jo Farrar, said: “During the pandemic so many colleagues came forward to be redeployed to different areas, at times putting their own health and wellbeing at risk. It is wonderful that Rachel’s outstanding efforts have been recognised and she should be really proud of this achievement. Congratulations, Rachel.”

    Rachel commented: “I feel honoured to have been awarded a British Empire Medal. It’s lovely to have been nominated by a patient and to know that I had such an impact during their time in hospital.

    “I’m really proud to have been part of the Physiotherapy and Kingston Hospital team during the pandemic – none of this would have been possible if we didn’t have such an amazing and supportive team. Everyone across the hospital worked really hard during the pandemic and I feel that this award is for all of us.”

  43. Kingston Hospital Charity’s ‘Night to Remember’

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    On Saturday 1 October, Kingston Hospital Charity will be holding its first memory walk.

    ‘Night to Remember’ is an opportunity for family, friends, and colleagues to come together and celebrate the life of loved one, whilst walking a route of five miles or 15 miles, starting and finishing at the Market Place in Kingston.

    Proceeds from the event will help Kingston Hospital to expand its support for bereaved families.

    For more information, visit https://www.khc.org.uk/events/nighttoremember/

    Book before the end of June and pay only £20 registration fee. Entry includes a bespoke t-shirt, which can be collected and worn on the day, and a medal.

    If you would like to take part but are unable to participate in the official walk, why not consider undertaking your own virtual walk? Kingston Hospital Charity can help you to plan your own activity – contact Tracey Shaw (Fundraising Manager) on tracey.shaw17@nhs.net or call 020 8973 5040.

  44. ‘Night Club’ installation supports staff working night shifts

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    Over three nights this month, an award-winning health support programme designed specifically for key workers arrived at Kingston Hospital.

    The ‘Night Club’ installation allowed staff working night shifts the opportunity to speak to a sleep expert and to find out tips and advice on improving their sleep and wellbeing.

    Staff were able to drop in to the exhibition between the hours of 8pm and 3am, or 10pm and 5am, to access information and to pick up food and drinks, to help keep them energised.

  45. Jubilee partygoers reminded about staying safe in hot weather and bank holiday NHS services

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    With thousands in south west London gearing up for a royal celebration outdoors the NHS remains open and here for local people if they need urgent care.

    If someone is struggling with their mental health, they should seek help via the 24/7 crisis lines – for Kingston, Richmond, Merton, Sutton or Wandsworth ring 0800 028 8000. For Croydon call 0800 731 2864 (Option 1)

    GPs are offering more appointments, including evenings and weekends, for people with urgent health needs.  Most appointments will be by telephone or through video consultation, but face to face appointments are still offered if necessary. 

    Practices will let their patients know how to access urgent medical help between 8am and 8pm, with contact information also available on practice websites. People can also visit 111online or call 111 at any time, where they will be asked some questions about symptoms on the website, or by speaking to a fully trained adviser on the phone. 

    Using 999 is for emergencies and should only be called if the situation is life-threatening. 

    Dr Vasa Gnanapragasam, lead GP for Merton, said: “Many of us enjoy being outside in hotter weather with family and friends but none of us want that to be spoiled by the need for medical treatment.

    “So, whether you’re having a Jubilee street party or heading off out for the day with family or friends, it’s important to take simple precautions like drinking plenty of water, using high-factor sun cream and remembering to take allergy medication if you need it.

    “Taking these simple steps will help avoid preventable illness and I would like to wish you all a fantastic weekend of joyful celebrations.”

    On where to seek urgent help if needed, Dr Gnanapragasam said: “NHS services continue to be very busy, and you can also help us by using 999 only in emergencies for life-threatening situations such as chest pain, blackouts, a serious injury, or if you think you’re having a stroke.  If you think you need help but aren’t sure where to go, contact NHS 111 first, by phone or online.

    If you need urgent health care

    · If it is a life-threatening emergency, then call 999 

    · If you are told to go to hospital, then you must go. The NHS will help you get the care you need. 

    If you need urgent mental health care 

    · For Kingston, Richmond, Merton, Sutton or Wandsworth ring the 24/7 crisis line at South West London St George’s 0800 028 8000 – https://www.swlstg.nhs.uk/patients-carers/crisis-support/mental-health-support-line  

    · For Croydon call South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust  on 0800 731 2864 (Option 1) https://slam.nhs.uk/contact-us

    If you need advice from a pharmacist 

    · For minor medical problems, not related to coronavirus, many local pharmacies will be open and are able to help this weekend – although their opening times may be different 

    · A number of pharmacies in London will be open for longer hours – search for a pharmacy at www.nhs.uk/service-search/find-a-pharmacy

    If you think you need urgent dental treatment

    · Call your dentist 

    · If you cannot contact your dentist, or you do not have one, use the NHS 111 online service or call if you cannot get online 

    · If an appointment is necessary, this will be arranged at an urgent dental care centre. 

    If you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms

    · Stay at home and visit http://nhs.uk/coronavirus for health advice  

    · Do not go to your GP practice, pharmacy or A&E 

    · If your symptoms worsen, or you feel that you cannot manage at home, please visit the NHS111 online coronavirus service. Call 111 if you cannot get online or you’ve been told to do so. 

    If you think you need advice from a GP

    · GP services are available this Bank Holiday weekend 

    · Contact your practice online or by phone to be assessed 

    · If your practice is not open but an appointment is necessary, you will be advised of the next steps. Your appointment may be at another nearby service. 

    Coronavirus vaccine

    · Vaccine clinics remain open across south west London, details available here – https://swlondonccg.nhs.uk/covid/vaccination-walk-in-clinics/

    · Vaccines are available for: 

    · 1st and 2nd doses for people aged 5 years old and over 

    · boosters for people aged 16 years old and over, plus at-risk children aged 12 to 15 years old 

    · spring boosters for people aged 75 years old and over, plus people aged 12 years old and over with a weakened immune system 

    · additional primary doses for people with a severely weakened immune system aged 12 years old and over.

  46. Listen to episode 3 of Kingston Hospital’s Health Talks podcast

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    Episode 3 of Kingston Hospital’s Health Talks podcast focuses on the topic of diabetes and is hosted by Sam Armstrong, Director of Corporate Affairs at Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare (HRCH).

    Hear from Claire Neely (Diabetes Nurse Consultant and joint Clinical Lead at Kingston Hospital) and Michelle Hooper (Diabetes Dietitian and Clinical Service Manager at HRCH) as they discuss the signs and symptoms, as well as services and support available at Kingston Hospital and within the local community, for those with diabetes.

    Listen now

  47. Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic launches at Kingston Hospital

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    Kingston Hospital has launched a Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic to support early and faster diagnosis of cancer.

    The new clinic will provide a much-needed service to patients who have non-specific symptoms which may be hard to diagnose.

    Jane Stephenson (Cancer Patient Partners Group, Kingston Hospital) said: “The launch of the Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic is great news for patients who may well have been struggling to receive a diagnosis for their worrying symptoms. It will help to reduce stress, speed up diagnosis and therefore save lives.”

    Elizabeth Crowther (Acting Lead Nurse for Cancer and Acute Oncology Service Lead at Kingston Hospital) said: “The Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic at Kingston Hospital will provide high quality personalised diagnostic care, for patients in our local community with vague symptoms that are suggestive of cancer. Previously these patients may have presented multiple times to their GP, and had several investigations and referrals to secondary care, over long periods of time. Many of these patients may have then presented at a late cancer stage to Kingston Hospital’s emergency services.

    “With the new clinic in place, our local GP partners will now have a clear pathway to direct these patients to and the service will reduce the number of duplicate referrals and unnecessary attendances, whilst achieving what really matters to patients – early and faster diagnosis.”

    Nic Kane (Chief Nurse at Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare) said: “I am delighted to be expanding our cancer services here at Kingston Hospital. As we emerge from the COVID pandemic, it is really important that we are able to provide local people with the care they need at the right time, and our Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic will support this.”

    Find out more about the Rapid Diagnostic Cancer Clinic.

  48. Sun awareness month

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    May is Sun Awareness Month 3-9th May                        A picture containing graphical user interface

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    It is the British Association of Dermatologist’s (BAD) campaign to raise awareness for the public about sun protection and skin cancer.

    Exposure to the sun and using sunbeds increases your likelihood of getting skin cancer. They can also: 

    • Speed up ageing
    • Cause blisters, headaches, and sunstroke
    • Weaken your immune system
    • Cause permanent damage to your eyes
    • Lead to dehydration and heat exhaustion

    And still, year on year, people fail to take the necessary precautions.  

    5 myths about sun exposure:       

    • People with dark skin don’t need to wear sun cream 
    • Tanning is always safe as long as you don’t burn
    • You can only burn in summer or when the weather’s warm
    • You can’t burn through glass          
    • Sunbeds are safer than exposure to the sun

    5 ways you can stay safe in the sun:   

    • Wear protective clothing 
    • Use sun cream – the more protection the better – broad spectrum of at least F30 and UVA star rating – and apply it throughout the day
    • Limit your time in the sun between 10 am and 4 pm as these are peak hours
    • Wear sunglasses
    • Sit in the shade at regular intervals.

    Watch this video on sun protection on our skin cancer website:

    Visit these websites for more information on skin cancer and sun protection:

    1. https://www.britishskinfoundation.org.uk/what-is-skin-cancer
    2. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/non-melanoma-skin-cancer/
    3. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/melanoma-skin-cancer
    4. Sun Awareness – BAD Patient Hub (skinhealthinfo.org.uk)
  49. NHS services in south west London over the May bank holiday weekend

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    South west Londoners needing urgent mental health care over the bank holiday weekend are being reminded help is on hand.

    The local NHS is telling people that if they are struggling with their mental health, they should seek help.

    In Merton, Wandsworth, Sutton, Kingston and Richmond people can call the crisis line on 0800 028 8000 at any time for support. Find out more at https://www.swlstg.nhs.uk/patients-carers/crisis-support/mental-health-support-line  

    In Croydon people are asked to contact 0800 731 2864 and use option 1. Alternatively, they can get more information at  https://slam.nhs.uk/contact-us

    The NHS remains very busy so people who have a problem with their physical health are being encouraged to use A&E and 999 only in an emergency.

    GPs are offering more appointments, including evenings and weekends, for those with urgent health needs. 

    Most appointments will be by telephone or through video consultation, but face to face appointments are still offered if necessary. 

    GP practices will let their patients know how to access urgent medical help between 8am and 8pm, with contact information also available on practice websites.

    People can also visit 111online or call 111 at any time, where they will be asked some questions about symptoms on the website, or by speaking to a fully trained adviser on the phone. 

    Dr Vasa Gnanapragasam, lead GP for Merton, said:  

    “Our teams are working incredibly hard to provide Londoners with the best possible care should they become unwell.

    “If you need urgent mental health care this bank holiday weekend, please contact one of the 24-hour numbers so that you can be directed to the right support service for you.

    “We have extra GP services and more appointments on evenings and weekends – if you have a health concern over the long weekend, contact your GP practice or use their website to find out what your local arrangements are, or use the NHS 111 online service for health advice. 

    “We are also urging people to support the NHS and remember that 999 is for emergencies and should only be called if the situation is life-threatening, such as chest pain, blackouts, a serious injury, or if you think you’re having a stroke. 

    “Despite the NHS being extremely busy, frontline staff continue to work to address the Covid-19 backlogs and roll out the NHS spring booster programme, so please do come forward for your Covid-19 jabs.” 

    If you need urgent health care 

    • If it is a life-threatening emergency, then call 999 
    • If you are told to go to hospital, then you must go. The NHS will help you get the care you need. 

    If you need urgent mental health care  

    If you need advice from a pharmacist  

    • For minor medical problems, not related to coronavirus, many local pharmacies will be open and are able to help this weekend – although their opening times may be different 
    • A number of pharmacies in London will be open for longer hours – search for a pharmacy at www.nhs.uk/service-search/find-a-pharmacy 

    If you think you need urgent dental treatment 

    • Call your dentist 
    • If you cannot contact your dentist, or you do not have one, use the NHS 111 online service or call if you cannot get online 
    • If an appointment is necessary, this will be arranged at an urgent dental care centre. 

    If you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms 

    • Stay at home and visit http://nhs.uk/coronavirus for health advice  
    • Do not go to your GP practice, pharmacy or A&E 
    • If your symptoms worsen, or you feel that you cannot manage at home, please visit the NHS111 online coronavirus service. Call 111 if you cannot get online or you’ve been told to do so. 

    If you think you need advice from a GP 

    • GP services are available this Bank Holiday weekend 
    • Contact your practice online or by phone to be assessed 
    • If your practice is not open but an appointment is necessary, you will be advised of the next steps. Your appointment may be at another nearby service. 

    Coronavirus vaccine 

    • Vaccine clinics remain open across south west London, details available here – https://swlondonccg.nhs.uk/covid/vaccination-walk-in-clinics/ 
    • Vaccines are available for: 
    • 1st and 2nd doses for people aged 5 years old and over 
    • boosters for people aged 16 years old and over, plus at-risk children aged 12 to 15 years old 
    • spring boosters for people aged 75 years old and over, plus people aged 12 years old and over with a weakened immune system 
    • additional primary doses for people with a severely weakened immune system aged 12 years old and over.
  50. Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

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    April is Bowel Cancer Awareness Month, the fourth most common cancer in the UK. Every 15 minutes someone is diagnosed with the disease, that’s nearly 43,000 people each year. 

    Bowel cancer is also the UK’s second biggest cancer killer, however it shouldn’t be because it’s treatable and curable especially if diagnosed early. Nearly everyone survives bowel cancer if diagnosed at the earliest stage but this drops significantly as the disease develops. Early diagnosis really does save lives.

    That’s why we’re supporting Bowel Cancer Awareness Month and Bowel Cancer UK, the UK’s leading bowel cancer charity, to raise awareness of the symptoms of bowel cancer:

    • Bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo
    • A persistent and unexplained change in bowel habit
    • Unexplained weight loss
    • Extreme tiredness for no obvious reason
    • A pain or lump in your tummy

    Most people with these symptoms don’t have bowel cancer. Other health problems can cause similar symptoms. But if you have one or more of these, or if things just don’t feel right, see your GP.

    For more information about bowel cancer visit www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk or www.macmillan.org.uk

    The Macmillan information and support centre at Kingston hospital can help with any questions you may have too. 0208 973 5001

  51. Emergency Department access over the Easter weekend

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    Due to construction work, the access road and pedestrian pathway to our Emergency (A&E) Department will be closed between the hours of 6am and 6pm on Friday 15 April, Saturday 16 April, Sunday 17 April and Monday 18 April.

    To access the department during these hours, please use the main hospital entryway from Galsworthy Road.

  52. NHS services in south west London over the Easter weekend 

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    South west Londoners are being asked to support their local NHS over the bank holiday weekend by only using 999 and A&E in emergencies. 

    The NHS remains very busy, but people can continue to get urgent care – GPs are offering more appointments, including evenings and weekends, for people with urgent health needs. 

    Most appointments will be by telephone or through video consultation, but face to face appointments are still offered if necessary. 

    GP practices will let their patients know how to access urgent medical help between 8am and 8pm, with contact information also available on practice websites. People can also visit 111online or call 111 at any time, where they will be asked some questions about symptoms on the website, or by speaking to a fully trained adviser on the phone. 

    Using 999 is for emergencies and should only be called if the situation is life-threatening. 

    Dr Vasa Gnanapragasam, lead GP for Merton, said:  

    “Our teams are working incredibly hard to provide Londoners with the best possible care should they become unwell. We have extra GP services and more appointments on evenings and weekends – if you have a health concern over the bank holiday weekend, contact your GP practice or use their website to find out what your local arrangements are, or use the NHS 111 online service for health advice. 

    “We are also urging people to support the NHS and remember that 999 is for emergencies and should only be called if the situation is life-threatening, such as chest pain, blackouts, a serious injury, or if you think you’re having a stroke. 

    “Despite the NHS being extremely busy, frontline staff continue to work to address the Covid-19 backlogs and roll out the NHS spring booster programme, so please do come forward for your Covid-19 jabs.” 

    If you need urgent health care 

    • If it is serious or a life-threatening emergency, then call 999 
    • If you are told to go to hospital, then you must go. The NHS will help you get the care you need. 

    If you need urgent mental health care  

    If you need advice from a pharmacist that is not related to coronavirus 

    • For minor medical problems, not related to coronavirus, many local pharmacies will be open and are able to help this weekend – although their opening times may be different 
    • A number of pharmacies in London will be open for longer hours – search for a pharmacy at www.nhs.uk/service-search/find-a-pharmacy 

    If you think you need urgent dental treatment 

    • Call your dentist 
    • If you cannot contact your dentist, or you do not have one, use the NHS 111 online service or call if you cannot get online 
    • If an appointment is necessary, this will be arranged at an urgent dental care centre. 

    If you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms 

    • Stay at home and visit nhs.uk/coronavirus for health advice  
    • Do not go to your GP practice, pharmacy or A&E 
    • If your symptoms worsen, or you feel that you cannot manage at home, please visit the NHS111 online coronavirus service. Call 111 if you cannot get online or you’ve been told to do so. 

    If you or people you live with do not have coronavirus symptoms and you think you need advice from a GP 

    • GP services are available this Bank Holiday weekend 
    • Contact your practice online or by phone to be assessed 
    • If your practice is not open but an appointment is necessary, you will be advised of the next steps. Your appointment may be at another nearby service. 

    Coronavirus vaccine 

    • Vaccine clinics remain open across south west London, details available here – https://swlondonccg.nhs.uk/covid/vaccination-walk-in-clinics/ 
    • Vaccines are available for 
    • 1st and 2nd doses for people aged 5 years old and over 
    • boosters for people aged 16 years old and over, plus at-risk children aged 12 to 15 years old 
    • spring boosters for people aged 75 years old and over, plus people aged 12 years old and over with a weakened immune system 
    • additional primary doses for people with a severely weakened immune system aged 12 years old and over 
  53. Helping our patients to ‘Spring home for Easter’

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    This Easter, we want to help as many of our inpatients as possible to get home, so they can recover in familiar surroundings, close to family and friends. That’s why we’ve launched our ‘Spring home for Easter’ campaign.

    Over the coming days, our inpatient teams will be focusing on getting patients well enough to go home and working with families and carers to ensure that people who can go home are able to do so safely and with the right support in place.

    Speak to a member of staff to find out what you can do to help get your loved one home this Easter, if safe to do so.

    If you have any concerns about yourself or a loved one returning home for Easter, please let the staff on the ward know.

  54. What should I do if I need help from a medical expert?

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    Did you know that your local pharmacist can offer immediate advice on a wide range of health issues and guidance on whether you need to seek additional help?

    Your local pharmacy can provide help and reassurance from a medical expert, without the need to book an appointment. Some pharmacies are open past 5pm. Find out more:  https://bit.ly/3sbVjGb

    You can also go to your GP for help and support with medical conditions, or to your dentist if you have dental pain or toothache.

    The Emergency (A&E) Department at Kingston Hospital is currently very busy.  If you think you need to come to the Emergency Department, contact NHS 111 first. You can avoid busy waiting rooms by booking an appointment to get the best service for you.

    Go to 111.nhs.uk (for people aged 5 and over) or call 111 for free from a landline or mobile phone (all ages).

  55. Statement from Kingston Hospital and Kingston Maternity Voices in response to the Ockenden Report

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    In light of the national report that was recently published investigating the care provided by Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust Maternity Services, Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Kingston Maternity Voices Partnership (MVP) would like to provide reassurance to local families that all our hospital staff and all our volunteers within the MVP are here to offer support.

    We are really proud of our maternity services and we are committed to ensuring you receive excellent standards of safety and high quality care.

    The safety of women and their babies is our top priority. If you have any questions or concerns at any point in your pregnancy, or after you have had your baby, please speak to your midwife who will be very happy to help you.

    We share our heartfelt condolences and well wishes to all the families affected by the cases outlined within the Ockenden Report.

  56. Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs becomes Chair of Kingston Hospital

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    Today (1 April 2022), Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs has taken up her role as Chair in Common of Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare (HRCH), following the retirement of Sian Bates at the end of March.

    Previously, Sukhvinder was Vice Chair at Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust and led Workforce and Education for 7,000 employees.  She also chaired the Quality and Safety Committee for the GP Care Group in Tower Hamlets – a vanguard primary care federation.

    Currently, she is Chair of the Thames Water Customer Challenge, a Board Member of the Regulator for Social Housing and Chair of Regeneration for the London Legacy Development Corporation.
     
    Sukhvinder is an accomplished CEO having led two high profile organisations (Barrow Cadbury and Runnymede Trust), through major change programmes and onto success in influencing government policies on inclusion, diversity and social justice. She is passionate about putting people first – staff, patients and the communities we serve.

    Sukhvinder said“I am delighted to have been appointed as Chair in Common of the Trusts and I really look forward to working with the teams to build on the well-established collaborative working arrangements already in place.

    “I’ve been really impressed by everything I have heard from the staff, patients and volunteers that I’ve met so far from both of the Trusts and I know from the conversations I’ve had already that there is a real opportunity for us to keep working to join up local health and social care for residents.

    “I’m very much looking forward to working in partnership with staff and all of the stakeholders to support the delivery of outstanding care.”

    Jo Farrar added: “I’d like to welcome Sukhvinder to the Boards of both Trusts. It’s a really exciting time to join HRCH and Kingston Hospital and I’m sure that Sukhvinder will enjoy working with us and leading our organisations through times of change.

    “We have a lot to do in the months and years ahead and I really look forward to working with Sukhvinder in 2022 and beyond.”

  57. HSJ Partnership Award winners

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    Colleagues in Kingston Hospital’s estates and procurement teams were recently awarded a Health Service Journal (HSJ) Partnership Award in the category of ‘Best Estates Optimisation Project’, alongside Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals and Steris (a global provider of products and services supporting patient care) for their work in creating an innovative, purpose-built sterilisation and decontamination facility.

    The Steris Chessington decontamination facility opened in July 2021 following an extensive programme of construction work, which continued throughout the COVID pandemic. Designed and built in partnership with South West London Procurement Partnership (SWLPP) it is the UK’s largest sterilisation and decontamination facility, and is equipped with industry leading Infection Prevention Technologies (IPT) and reprocessing equipment. The new facility has a processing capacity of over 15 million instruments per annum.

    Judges said: “The collaborative approach demonstrated innovation and trust across the partnership, breaking down clinical barriers through high quality data to support innovation as well as, improve practice and service models, reducing variation. They also recognised the achievement of a sustainable solution that demonstrated excellent clinical, workforce and operational outcomes alongside a high level of social value. The quality of the build, the capacity modelling and the working environment showed the commitment of all partners to the estate and scheme.”

    Kingston Hospital originally delivered decontamination services for reusable surgical equipment on site, however outsourcing this to the Steris Chessington facility allows for a number of service and quality improvements. The circular nature of the services delivered at the centre means that the Trust benefits from the latest products and innovations in surgical instrument decontamination, low temperature processing for surgical robotics and endoscopes and on-site instrument repair and procurement.

    The HSJ Partnership Awards ceremony was held at Park Plaza, Westminster in Central London, and was attended by leaders and professionals from both the NHS and private sector as well as figures from non-clinical backgrounds.

    For more information on the HSJ Partnership Awards visit: https://partnership.hsj.co.uk/

  58. Introducing our ICARE programme for HCAs

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    Our Healthcare Assistants (HCAs) are valued members of our multi-disciplinary teams here at Kingston Hospital. Thanks to feedback and insight from staff across the Trust, we have created a new programme offering development opportunities and support to all our Band 2 Healthcare Assistants.

    The ICARE programme offers:

    • A ‘buddy’ to provide 1:1 support and guidance through the first two weeks in their allocated ward or department
    • An 18-month pathway to develop skills and support staff in progressing to Band 3 positions
    • Monthly open forums to share ideas, education and training
    • Access to a dedicated Wellbeing Chaplain, offering support, a listening ear and providing the opportunity for confidential conversations at any time

    Find out more about working at Kingston Hospital and view our current vacancies: https://kingstonhospital.nhs.uk/work-for-us/

  59. Congratulations to Pauline Woods MBE

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    Congratulations to Pauline Woods MBE, former Kingston Hospital employee and founder of neonatal charity Born Too Soon.

    Pauline was invested with her MBE this week at Windsor Castle, for her services to parents and young people.

  60. Better Together: Our partnership with HRCH

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    We know that working together with other local health and care organisations means we are better able to provide the kind of joined up health and care services that local people want – services which are fair for all and provide good value for money.

    It is only by working together that we can tackle larger population health issues and healthcare inequalities, helping to prevent unnecessary hospital admissions, and keeping our local residents healthy.

    To this end, the boards of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust and Kington Hospital NHS Foundation Trust have agreed to a close partnership arrangement.

    We already have a joint Chief Executive, Chairman and Chief Nurse. And from April 2022, the two executive leadership teams will come together as a Committee in Common which will be empowered to make key strategic decisions with the benefit of expertise and insight from across our full range of services.

    We call this exciting programme of work Better Together and we’ve created a microsite where we will share regular updates. Find out more at:

    www.hounslowkingstonandrichmondhealthcare.com

  61. Prostate cancer awareness month

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    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in men in the UK with over 52,000 diagnosed each year  

    • The Incidence rates for prostate cancer in the UK are highest in males aged 75 to 79 
    • It is predicted that almost 8 in 10 (77.6%) of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in England survive their disease for ten years or more (2013-2017). 
    • There are around 11,900 prostate cancer deaths in the UK every year, (2016-2018) 
    • A person’s risk of developing cancer depends on many factors, including age, genetics, and exposure to risk factors (including some potentially avoidable lifestyle factors). 
    • 1 in 6 UK males will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. 
    • Prostate cancer is not clearly linked to any preventable risk factors 
    • Most men will die with the disease rather than from it.  

     [taken from cancer research UK] 

    At Kingston hospital 313 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2019  

    241 men in 2020 and 224 men in 2021.  

    Kingston hospital links with the Royal Marden Hospital where addition treatment such a surgery or radiotherapy takes place. 

    For more details about Prostate cancer and symptoms as well as general mens health please visit  

    www.prostatecanceruk.org 

    www.macmillan.org.uk 

    www.cancerresearch.org.uk 

    Men’s health – NHS (www.nhs.uk) 

    You can visit or call  our Macmillan information centre on the ground floor of the Sir William Rous Unit at Kingston Hospital for further information.  

    Telephone: 0208 973 5001 

    Email khft.macinfoswru@nhs.net 

  62. Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

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    Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

    Two thirds of those with ovarian cancer are diagnosed too late when the cancer has already spread. This March Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

    • Only 1 in 5 women know that bloating is a symptom of ovarian cancer 
    • Only 1 in 100 women know that needing to wee more often is a symptom 
    • 4 in 10 women wrongly believe that cervical screening detects ovarian cancer 

    Diagnosed early, ovarian cancer is easier to treat, yet too many people don’t know the symptoms. 

    March is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month 

    For further information on ovarian cancer and its symptoms please go to :

    www.targetovariancancer.org.uk

    www.ovacome.org.uk

    www.macmillan.org.uk

    www.cancerresearch.org.uk

    You can visit or call  our Macmillan information centre on the ground floor of the Sir William Rous Unit at Kingston Hospital for further information.

    Telephone: 0208 973 5001

    Email khft.macinfoswru@nhs.net

  63. A globetrotting tale from Bombay to London: dancing, research, and science

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    Growing up in India and Kuwait, Roshni shares her story from her early childhood, her university days in the USA and her time in Germany, to settling with her family in the UK and what led her to become a Senior Clinical Trials Practitioner at Kingston Hospital.

    Birthplace to Rudyard Kipling, Salman Rushdie and Homi Bhabha, Roshni grew up in Bombay (since she was a baby), which was renamed Mumbai in 1995. She adds: “Both my parents’ families are of south Indian heritage. Growing up in Bombay was incredible – we were exposed to different cultures, and people from all walks of life. I’m really proud of my heritage.”

    Roshni’s father’s job meant a move for the family to Kuwait, where they stayed for nine years. “Life in Kuwait was like Bombay; we were part of an Indian community and had many Arab and international friends.”

    In June 1990, Roshni’s aunt died suddenly. She says: “We flew back to India for the funeral. My parents adopted my two cousins and from then on, I had three siblings instead of one. Only dad stayed back in Kuwait.”

    Shortly after, Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. Roshni adds: “Our life changed; we couldn’t go back to Kuwait. We didn’t hear from dad for several months, but eventually he got out with a convoy through Jordan. We went from having everything to nothing. This kind of experience teaches you about life and resilience.”

    Roshni went on to finish her undergraduate in nutritional science in Bombay, became a registered dietician and completed her masters, too. She shares: “Initially I had joined medical school, but much to my family’s dismay, because most southern Indian people either become doctors or engineers, it wasn’t for me. I wanted to pursue research because the creativity of conceiving ideas into research projects, that ultimately help people, was very appealing to me.”

    With a PhD scholarship and a one-way ticket, Roshni travelled 8,500 miles to Pennsylvania, USA. She adds: “I experienced winter for the first time – so much snow – I absolutely loved it. Spending 10-hour days in the lab, I adjusted to life away from home on an international campus. Uni is also where I met my husband, Boris, who is German. After 20 years of marriage, people joke that I look quite Indian, but inside I’m quite German; in the sense that I love their straightforwardness and honesty.”

    After her PhD, Roshni started postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins in immunology. She says: “After 9/11, we decided to move to Munich in Germany, closer to Boris’ family and to India. There I started my second postdoctoral training at the Technical University of Munich in nuclear medicine.”

    “In 2007, Boris got a new job in London, and we relocated to the UK. I worked at the UCL Royal Free Hospital in hepatology which was my first insight into an academic university hospital in the UK. Next, it was in cardiology at Kings College, Denmark Hill. These were wonderful research opportunities and gave me a real insight to understand different specialties.”

    Having found their dream family house, they moved from Southfields to Kingston. Roshni says: “Our two girls were young at that time, and I did not want to take up a full-time research job. In 2013, I joined Kingston Hospital’s volunteering team which I found extremely inspiring.”

    Roshni then started working in Occupational Therapy and has been at Kingston Hospital in various roles ever since. She adds: “In early 2021, I joined the Research team. My role is patient focused and currently I am responsible for the delivery of the dermatology portfolio and a few other studies. I’m responsible for identifying eligible patients, consenting, organising patient assessments and visits, seeing patients in clinic, coordinating collection and preparation of biological samples, and supporting patients throughout the delivery of their care on clinical trials.”

    When asked what she likes to do outside of work, Roshni replies: “I’ve danced since I was three. I’m a trained Indian classical dancer and a flamenco dancer. I also make semi-precious jewellery.”

    If she wasn’t a Senior Clinical Trials Practitioner, what job would Roshni like to do? She replies: “I would be a jewellery designer. I love a bit of bling. There’s also the mineralogy and the geology angle to it that interests me, which comes from when my dad took us to the diamond mines.”

    When asked about the best part of her job. Roshni shares: “I love my job and the interaction with patients, clinical teams and various other stakeholders. Research has always been my passion. We have lots to be proud of at Kingston as we strive to improve health through research. We are doing well with engagement from our patients and our clinical teams and if we can use research to develop creative solutions together at Kingston to improve patient care, than that would be the icing on the cake for me.”

  64. Kingston Hospital opens Admissions on the Day Unit to support elective recovery

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    A new unit for patients undergoing planned surgery has recently opened at Kingston Hospital, to support the recovery of elective care.

    The Admissions on the Day Unit is located next to the hospital’s theatres, enabling patients to arrive at the unit on the morning of their surgery and to move quickly into theatres, for their procedure.

    Sarb Sandhu, Kingston Hospital’s Chief of Surgery and Planned Care, said: “This new unit will provide a much more efficient way for us to manage elective care. Patients coming in for planned procedures will be able to stay in one place, as opposed to being on wards across the hospital, and will benefit from a significantly smoother and quicker pathway, from arrival for their surgery through to having their procedure.

    “Not only will this make a difference to our patients’ experience, but it will also mean we can see a greater number of patients for elective procedures, in a shorter space of time.”

    Every patient attending Kingston Hospital for elective surgery will start their admission within this dedicated unit.

    Watch a short video tour of the Admissions on the Day Unit:

  65. Kingston’s maternity service placed top in London following National Maternity Survey

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    Findings from the Care Quality Commission’s National Maternity Survey 2021 have placed Kingston Hospital’s maternity service as the top performing maternity service in London.

    A total of 242 service users took part in the survey, which invited them to rate their antenatal care, experience of labour and birth, and postnatal care.

    Kingston Hospital and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare’s Chief Nurse, Nic Kane, said: “We are delighted with the results of the National Maternity Survey 2021, which reflect the great dedication of our maternity teams at a time of significant challenge due to the COVID-19 pandemic. I am proud of the outstanding care that my colleagues deliver on a daily basis to the women of South West London and their families, and I would to thank them for all that they do. I would also like to thank everyone who responded to the survey, your feedback is so important to us.”

    Key results for Kingston Hospital, which were published this month as part of the survey’s national benchmarked findings, include:

    Antenatal care:

    • 100% said they were spoken to in a way they could understand
    • 99% felt involved enough in decisions about their care
    • 99% said they were given the help the needed by midwives
    • 97% of service users said that had enough time to ask questions or discuss their pregnancy

    Experience of labour and birth:

    • 100% of staff introduced themselves during labour and birth
    • 99% were spoken to in a way they could understand
    • 97% felt they were involved in decisions about care
    • 96% said a birthing partner was involved as much as wanted

    Postnatal care:

    • 99% of respondents felt listened to by midwives once they were back at home
    • 97% said their found their decisions about to how to feed their baby were respected by midwives
    • 96% had confidence and trust in postnatal midwives
    • 88% of respondents found that their partner was able to stay with them as long as they wanted following birth


    Benchmark reports for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) National Maternity Survey 2021 can be viewed here: https://nhssurveys.org/all-files/04-maternity/05-benchmarks-reports/2021/

    The response rate to the survey at Kingston Hospital was above the national average among NHS maternity services, with 66% of service users taking part.

    Women currently receiving care from Kingston Hospital’s maternity service will be invited to take part in the CQC’s National Maternity Survey 2022.

  66. Virtual wards empowering patients

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    Working across HRCH, Kingston Hospital, social care and primary care, we have built on the experience of the Covid-19 pandemic by using remote monitoring technology to keep people safe in the community whilst avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions.

    Our virtual ward, which is initially aimed at patients with respiratory or cardiac issues, uses a coordinated approach where patients who attend A&E can be admitted directly to the virtual ward. They will be assessed by a specialist team and shown how to use the remote monitoring tools, such as blood pressure or pulse oximeter. The programme gives power back to patients to understand their own health needs and maintain their wellbeing in the comfort of their own home.

    Find out more in our video below.

  67. Tinnitus Week 2022 – watch our patient story

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    This week is the British Tinnitus Association’s Tinnitus Week. Did you know, around 30% of people will experience tinnitus at some point in their lives?

    In the following short film, Jan shares his experience of living with tinnitus and explains how Kingston Hospital’s audiology team and Tinnitus Support Group have helped him along the way:

    Find out more about Kingston Hospital’s Tinnitus Support Group.

  68. World Cancer Day

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    World Cancer Day is today 4th February. A day that unites people around the world to take action against cancer.

    This year’s World Cancer Day’s theme, “Close the Care Gap”, is all about raising awareness of this equity gap that affects almost everyone, in high as well as low- and middle-income countries. More details can be found at;

    Close The Care Gap I World Cancer Day

    Take a look at our Kingston Hospital Cancer webpages

    The Macmillan Cancer Centre at Kingston Hospital offers information and support to anyone who has concerns about cancer.

    Call 0208 973 5001 or email khft.macinfoswru@nhs.net

  69. Sharing site management practices with other hospitals

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    NHS England and NHS Improvement’s elective and emergency care improvement support team recently visited Kingston Hospital to speak with Tracey Moore (Director of Operations), Berenice Constable (Interim Deputy Chief Nurse) and Louise Hogh (Chief of Medicine, Unplanned Care) about our site management and escalation practices.

    The team created a short film to be shared with other Trusts across the country, as part of a winter support resource pack.

    You can watch the film here: https://youtu.be/wqoGmkx7KiU

  70. Our Cancer Service pages have been updated!

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    We are pleased to announce that our Cancer Services pages have undergone a complete redevelopment!

    The Communications Team have worked in partnership with the Cancer teams to create a more engaging, informative, and bespoke user experience. In addition, to make sure we get these changes right, the teams are working with our Cancer Patient Partners Group and asking them to feedback to us on the work done so we can make sure the changes we make are improving patient experience.

    Please visit the page for more: https://kingstonhospital.nhs.uk/departments-services/cancer-services/.

  71. From self-confessed sci-fi nerd to nurse consultant!

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    Born in Italy, Alberto (or Alb) talks about a love of music and how his passion for nursing brought him to the UK and Kingston Hospital, which is the first NHS trust in the UK with two nurse consultants in dermatology.

    Alberto lived in Italy for 26 years before moving to the UK in 2007. After eight years at St George’s, Tooting as a specialist nurse in dermatology, Alberto joined the dermatology team at Kingston Hospital as a clinical nurse specialist in 2016.

    Sharing his family roots, he says: “I was born near Treviso, in the northeast of Italy, which is about 22 miles from Venice. Treviso is the land of at least two great things: one is prosecco and the other is tiramisu. My mum and dad live in Italy, and I have a younger brother.”

    Having a passion for music and science growing up, Alberto shares: “I’ve always been a bit of a nerd. I indulge myself watching sci-fi action movies like The Avengers. I love science, particularly biology, however when I was much younger I loved music. When I was a teenager, music took so much of my head, I could have been better at school. I remember being in the car with my uncle, and there was a thunderstorm and Pink Floyd’s live album Pulse was playing. That was the moment I knew I wanted to learn to play the guitar!”

    Graduating from Padua in Italy – one of the oldest medical schools in the world – Alberto adds: “I decided to study nursing simply because I liked the subject, although I didn’t have a clear idea of what a nurse was back then. I’d never been to a hospital, but I liked the subjects – it’s very scientific and you get to help people. For four years I specialised in critical care. I worked in emergency care and the ambulance service because they don’t have paramedics in Italy – specialist nurses work as paramedics.”

    After Alberto came to the UK, he wanted to find a specialty to master. He says: “I always had an interest in wound care and skin surgery. An opportunity came up to work as a bank nurse in dermatology at St George’s. They noticed that I was really passionate about the specialty, and I think for that reason they offered me further career development.

    “Unfortunately, in Italy, nursing is seen as an auxiliary profession, so you don’t have much autonomy. You’re seen pretty much like an assistant of the doctor. I am grateful to the NHS as it recognises the potential for non-medical professions like nurses, specialist nurses, and physician associates. It’s thanks to that mentality that I have had the opportunity to evolve professionally. In the UK I feel really valued and respected as an individual, but also as a clinician. I felt compelled to give something back to the patients, so I progressed, and I became a nurse consultant.”

    Working with Saskia Reeken, who is also a nurse consultant at Kingston, Alberto adds: “We work so well together – we became a dynamic duo. It’s all thanks to Dr Jana, Nic Kane and Justine Sweet. They saw potential for the service to develop a pathway for patients that is completely nurse led. We started with three, and now we have a team of eight CNSs. We are proud of the holistic service we offer our patients and are always looking at ways to improve.”

    “We work alongside a great team of consultant dermatologists, and we integrate our working activity with them very well.

    “We treat patients with chronic skin disease. People often dismiss these conditions, but actually we see severe cases with large areas of the body affected and these skin conditions can also be linked to a number of health problems, such as obesity, depression, cardiac disease and diabetes.”

    Research is also important to Alberto. He says: “I’m a principal investigator for a couple of national studies about psoriasis. Dermatology at Kingston Hospital was recognised nationally as a high study recruitment site by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)”

    Alberto is also one of the clinical leads for the South West London Dermatology Network. He adds: “As a network we are looking at how dermatology patients will receive the same high standard of care across the hospital trusts in South West London. We are also looking into implementing Teledermatology. It is an exciting time.”

    When asked what the most rewarding part of his job is, Alberto says: “Helping patients with chronic skin disease. These people have often been suffering with their condition for decades, but after we’ve treated them, they are like a new person and can live their life!”

    What one thing would improve Alberto’s quality of life? “For the UK to have proper summer days with 26-degree heat and sunshine, but I guess you can’t have everything!”

  72. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

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    • 2 Women lose their lives to the disease every day
    • 9 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every day
    • 75% of cervical cancers can be prevented by cervical screening (smear tests)

    Further details can be found at :

    Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust | Cervical Cancer Charity (jostrust.org.uk)

    Cervical cancer symptoms and signs | The Eve Appeal

    Cervical cancer – stages, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment – Macmillan Cancer Support

    Gynae Cancer Information & Support UK | Go Girls Support Group

  73. Health and happiness are the best prescription

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    From completing her pre-registration at Chelsea and Westminster, working as a rotational pharmacist at King’s College Hospital, to The Royal Marsden as a clinical trials pharmacist, Rebecca gives an insight into life as a Senior Pharmacist and what led to her specialising in Haemato-oncology here at Kingston Hospital.

    Home to Downton Abbey, Jane Austen and Burberry, Rebecca was born and grew up in Hampshire. She says: “My mum has always been in Fleet and my dad lives in America. I’ve got a younger sister, Charlotte who lives in Southampton. We are always going up or down the M3 to visit one another!”

    Rebecca studied Pharmacy at the University of Bath and says she always wanted to do something in healthcare: “I thought about medicine and dentistry, but pharmacy grabbed my attention. I liked the fact that you could be clinical and patient facing, but I also like the science behind it in pharmacology. It really appealed to me as there’s lots of different career paths within pharmacy. I enjoy being with people – I’m a people person.”

    “I’ve only been at Kingston since May. I think it’s a great hospital and I’m so pleased that I’ve made the move. This role is different to my previous in that it’s not research based and is now specifically in Haemato-oncology (blood cancers), whereas before at The Marsden I was covering solid tumours as well.”

    When asked what a typical day looks like, Rebecca answers: “I’m not sure how I define a typical day because when you walk in, you don’t always know what you’re going to be facing. On three days of the week, I have a rotational pharmacist covering the service with me. We provide a clinical pharmacy service to the haematology day unit and screen all the chemotherapy drugs for our patients. There’s a lot of organisation involved, from making sure we’ve got funding in place, clinically screening the prescription for safety and appropriateness, then ordering the chemotherapy to ensure it is delivered to site in a timely manner, so we don’t delay patients’ treatment on the day. If patients have any supportive medications to go home with, we’ll screen these TTOs too. We also provide a service to our inpatients on the ward.”

    As well as the haematology day unit, Rebecca and the team provide a service to other areas of the hospitals. She adds: “We do a weekly ward round with the haematology consultant to review all our inpatients. We screen oral chemotherapy and haematology prescriptions for the outpatient clinics. There’s a lot of prescriptions we get through, and as we know within the oncology field, the service is ever increasing and evolving.

    “There’s always change because we have new drugs being licensed, new chemotherapy regimens and developments to treatment pathways. It’s really interesting – there’s never a day you don’t see something different or learn something new.”

    Rebecca shares how important the patient experience is: “To make the patient journey as safe as possible, we offer patients counselling on their chemotherapy medications and any supportive treatments that go with that. A holistic approach to patients’ care is paramount. We’ll review not only their chemotherapy, but also the other medicines they’re taking, to make sure there aren’t any interactions or contraindications. We provide information on how best to take their medicines, what side effects to look out for and how to manage them.

    “It can be quite a scary and daunting time for patients, and this gives them an opportunity to ask us any questions or discuss any apprehensions that they might have about starting this new treatment.”

    Rebecca shares her aspirations in life: “I’d love to expand the pharmacy haematology team so we can deliver a lot more of what we’ve got to offer. I would also like to become an independent prescriber. Aside from work, I think the most important thing you could want in life is your health and happiness, which has been particularly evident over the last two years.”

    We asked Rebecca what is the best part of her job. She said: “It’s seeing patients get better from their cancer. If you follow a patient through their chemotherapy treatment and they achieve remission, so they can live a relatively normal life, then you feel like you’ve done a good job.”

  74. Virtual Health and Care Q&A

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    Start the new year by tuning into a virtual Health and Care Q&A. Five experts will share insight into local healthcare services for the community and the impact of COVID-19, followed by a Q&A session. Click here to join Dr Nick Merrifield (GP and Clinical Director of NMWP PCN), Mr Sarb Sandhu (Chief of Surgery and Planned Care at Kingston Hospital), Iona Lidington (Director of Public Health, RBK), Dr Louise Hogh (Chief of Medicine for Unplanned care and Consultant Physician at Kingston Hospital) and Ed Montgomery (Managing Director of Your Healthcare) for this informative session on Thursday 6 January from 5pm. If you would like to submit a question in advance, please email: swlccg.nmwp.pcn@nhs.net.

  75. Jo Farrar appointed Chief Executive of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare

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    We are delighted to announce that following a formal interview process, Jo Farrar has been appointed as the Chief Executive of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust. This is in addition to his role as Chief Executive at Kingston Hospital.

    Jo has been Interim Chief Executive at HRCH since 1 April 2021, and has demonstrated his understanding of community services and passion for further developing the crucial role they play in supporting the health and wellbeing of the populations in our three boroughs, Hounslow, Kingston and Richmond. His proven track record for outstanding leadership, his enthusiasm and knowledge will further support our exciting plans for the integration of services and the ongoing development of staff in our boroughs and across the two integrated care systems in which we operate.

    Sarah Blow, Chief Executive Designate of the NHS South West London Integrated Care Board said: “I would like to congratulate Jo on his appointment and thank him for the work he has done in leading HRCH this year. I look forward to continuing to work with Jo in the new SWL integrated care system in the months ahead.”

    Jo Farrar said: “I am really excited to be appointed to the substantive Chief Executive position at HRCH. I’ve really enjoyed working with the fantastic staff at the Trust since April, so look forward to continuing to support them to provide the best care to people in Hounslow, Kingston and Richmond. People tell us that we deliver outstanding care and I look forward to continuing to be a part of the HRCH journey, in the months and years ahead.”

  76. Operation ‘Sleigh Bells’ – getting patients home this Christmas

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    This festive season, we want to help as many of our inpatients as possible to get home, so they don’t have to spend Christmas in hospital. That’s why we’ve launched Operation ‘Sleigh Bells’.

    Over the coming days, our inpatient teams will be assessing people’s health and doing everything they can to get them home in time for Christmas.

    To do this, we will be using of our new Transfer of Care Hub for Kingston and Richmond, which has been set up to bring together the expertise of community and hospital teams in one place, to facilitate safe and effective transfers of patients into and out of hospital.

    We will be working with families and carers to ensure that people who can go home are able to do so safely and with the right support in place, such as transport or additional equipment.

    Thomas Edwards, Integrated System Discharge Lead, said:

    “It’s important to identify patients now who will be able to go home for Christmas so we can make sure that any care needs are put in place ahead of time. If patients are unable to go home, but don’t need to be in hospital, the Transfer of Care Hub will aim to arrange patient transfers to community settings.”

    Flyers are available for patients and relatives with more details about the campaign. Please speak to a member of staff to find out what you can do to help get your loved one home this Christmas, if safe to do so.

    If you have any concerns about yourself or a loved one returning home for Christmas, please let the staff on the ward know.

  77. A recipe for nursing – a dash of kindness & understanding, a pinch of empathy & compassion and a sprinkle of goodwill & laughter.

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    From growing up with four brothers in Malaysia to living at a convent boarding school in Singapore, Mary talks about her life and being a CNS Haematology and Chemotherapy Nurse at Kingston Hospital.

    Born in Malaysia to a Singaporean father and Malaysian mother, Mary shares her roots: “My father was half Indian and half Portuguese, and my mother was half Indian and half Burmese. My late husband, Brian was Scottish. I love my Scottish heritage. Both our daughters have Scottish names: Fiona and Zoe.” 

    Mary’s parents’ work meant they travelled to different countries. She explains: “With four brothers, my mum thought it would be better for me if I went to a boarding school in Singapore. It was a safe place and it was there that I was able to nurture my caring side that would eventually lead me to nursing. I learnt to cook and grow fruit and vegetables in the convent gardens. I also learnt to play musical instruments and sang in the choir. In retirement, I plan to take up piano again.

    “Life in the convent taught me many things about myself, as well as my education I cared for the aging nuns so learnt from a very young age the importance of kindness and compassion. I have always been humble and never changed my personality. I’m the same now as when I was younger.”

    After her subsequent nurse training, Mary went on to study psychiatry at St Thomas’ Hospital and then joined Professor Peter Fenwick’s team as a research nurse at The Priory Hospital, Roehampton, she says: “During the ten years I was there, we carried out sphenoidal EEGs to study depression, sleep problems and behavioural change during illnesses.”

    “When you’re nursing, you don’t just use your skills, knowledge and experience. You use your compassion and empathy, while practising the NMC Code.”

    In 1989 Mary joined Kingston Hospital as the Hospital Hotel Manager and stayed in this role for almost 10 years whilst bringing up her daughters. She joined the League of Friends and at that time Norman Lamont was the League’s president, she tells us: “We raised £20,000 for the KingstonCan cancer scanner appeal. I loved it, for four years I helped run car boot sales and organised a black-tie dinner in the nurses’ home which is now Vera Brown House.”

    Life changed significantly for Mary in 1998, when her husband, Brian was diagnosed with cancer: “I quickly completed my return to practice and went back into nursing, mainly to get a deeper understanding about cancer. Although you would never wish suffering on your family or yourself, being a patient or seeing a loved one seriously ill can make you better equipped to understand your patients.”

    “Caring for my patients by making them a cup of tea, having a proper chat, genuinely listening to them, and making them smile/laugh are just as important to me as giving them their treatment.”

    Working on Derwent, a haematology ward at that time, Mary met Lesley Chamberlin who steered her into haematology, cancer, and chemotherapy, Mary now works in the Maxwell Thorne Haematology Day Unit, she says:

    “It’s a joy sometimes to be able to offer hope of remission (or even recovery) to people who think that all is lost. The care we give isn’t just for the sick but also for their loved ones. If we help the relatives and friends, they are then able to give the necessary support to the patients.”

    “Lesley and I have supported each other over the years when life has been tough, it’s essential that colleagues look out for each other.”

    We asked Mary what’s her secret ingredients to life: “I enjoy being kind and I love cooking. I cook to raise money for good causes. I love gardening too. I have a big garden. I bring seeds from around the world and try to grow them. I grow all sorts of things and I cook for the unit. I’m also a big tennis buff. I go to Wimbledon every year.”

    After 46 years working as a nurse, Mary is now retiring. She says: “I feel it’s time to take things a little easier and spend time with my husband Paul – we’ve been married for 7 years, and the family.  I have loved every moment of my 32 years at Kingston Hospital, great memories some challenging times and fun times and tears too. I think the NHS is brilliant. It’s a sacred cow. It’s a very giving system. The people who work within the NHS, particularly at Kingston, are a rich mixture of cultural and diverse backgrounds, our shared vocation brings us together, which makes it a very special place to work.”

  78. Specialist Audiologist presented with ‘Audiologist of the Year’ award

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    Geoff Whitby, Specialist Audiologist at Kingston Hospital, has been presented with the British Academy of Audiology (BAA) ‘Peggy Chalmers Audiologist of the Year’ award. This prestigious award recognises an Audiologist who stands out from the crowd with regards to patient care, and who has gone above and beyond to put patients first. 

    Geoff was nominated by Justine Sweet, Head of Audiology, who said in her nomination “As the COVID numbers surged after the initial outbreak, volunteers to be redeployed to our COVID wards were sought. Geoff didn’t think twice! Within 24 hours he was receiving orientation on our COVID ITU and over the coming weeks and months he showed extraordinary dedication and commitment. Geoff has since led our post COVID hearing screening service, supporting patients who report hearing and tinnitus concerns. All ITU staff have since highlighted how inspirational he is. We are so very proud of him.” 

    Geoff commented on the award, saying “A big thank you to the BAA committee for awarding me the ‘Peggy Chalmers Audiologist of the Year’ award. Peggy Chalmers, along with Dr J Knight, Graham Frost and Asker Mirtsa, were my tutors on the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear hospital course in the early 1980’s. This award is for all my fellow Audiologists I have met over the years, each and every one of you made me the Audiologist I am today. I would add a massive thank you to all on Kingston ITU for supporting me during my redeployment. During this time I saw the NHS and multi-disciplinary team work at it’s finest.” 

  79. Kingston Hospital awarded for commitment to patient safety by the National Joint Registry

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    Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is celebrating after being named as a National Joint Registry (NJR) Quality Data Provider following the successful completion of a national programme of local data audits.

    The NJR monitors the performance of hip, knee, ankle, elbow, and shoulder joint replacement operations to improve clinical outcomes primarily for the benefit of patients, but also to support orthopaedic clinicians and industry manufacturers. The registry collects high quality orthopaedic data in order to provide evidence to support patient safety, standards in quality of care, and overall cost-effectiveness in joint replacement surgery. The ‘NJR Quality Data Provider’ certificate scheme was introduced to offer hospitals a blueprint for reaching high quality standards relating to patient safety and to reward those who have met registry targets.

    In order to achieve the award, hospitals are required to meet a series of six ambitious targets during the audit period 2020/21. One of the targets which hospitals are required to complete is compliance with the NJR’s mandatory national audit aimed at assessing data completeness and quality within the registry.

    The NJR Data Quality Audit investigates the accurate number of joint replacement procedures submitted to the registry compared to the number carried out and recorded in the local hospital Patient Administration System. The audit ensures that the NJR is collecting and reporting upon the most complete, accurate data possible across all hospitals performing joint replacement operations, including Kingston Hospital.

    NJR targets also include having a high level of patients consenting for their details to be included in the registry and for hospitals to demonstrate timely responses to any alerts issued by the NJR in relation to potential patient safety concerns.

    Commenting, Ann Holliday, Speciality Quality Manager for Trauma & Orthopaedics said: “Improving patient safety is of the upmost importance and we fully support the National Joint Registry’s work in facilitating improvement in clinical outcomes and governance for the benefit of joint replacement patients. We are delighted to be awarded Quality Data Provider for a second year running.”

    National Joint Registry Medical Director, Mr Tim Wilton, said:“Congratulations to colleagues at Kingston Hospital. The Quality Data Provider Award demonstrates the high standards being met towards ensuring compliance with the NJR and is often a reflection of strong departmental efforts to achieve such status. Registry data now provides an important source of evidence for regulators, such as the Care Quality Commission, to inform their judgements about services, as well as being a fundamental driver to inform improved quality of care for patients.”

    Full details about the NJR’s Quality Data Provider certificate scheme can be found online at: https://www.njrcentre.org.uk

  80. From North to South in one throw of a dart

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    From working on a ward as a healthcare assistant to working in paediatrics and audiology, Jonny has worked in various roles before his current admin and clerical role: “I love my job and the NHS. I’m one of the personal assistants who look after members of the Executive Team.  I look after Alex Berry, Director of Transformation and Strategy and Yarlini Roberts, Chief Finance Officer as well their deputies – Denise Madden and Irfan Mundiya.”

    Proud of his northern roots, Jonny says: “I’m from Lincoln in Lincolnshire. I’m always going to be a country lad and dream of settling down in the Yorkshire Dales. I love it down here, but I just don’t like all the concrete buildings. With work and such, and with my life as it is, I have to be where I am for now.”

    “I’m the youngest of six children and my family still live in my hometown. I don’t think they will ever leave. I was the one destined to do things differently. One day in 2008, I threw a dart at a map on the wall, and it landed near Kingston upon Thames, so I packed a bag and jumped in the car and here I am.

    “I was always the shy one, but I think as I’ve got older, I’ve become more confident. I used to really worry about what other people thought of me, but it doesn’t bother me anymore. I believe we come into this world as a blank canvas, and I think who we hang out with and who and what we deal with over time, paints the picture of what we think the world is, when it could be totally different. We just need to keep changing our canvas.

    “I didn’t think an admin role would be for me because I’m dyslexic, but I’ve got my coping mechanisms, prompts and ways of dealing with certain words which I can never get right. I keep trying and I don’t let dyslexia define me because it shouldn’t, and it shouldn’t define anyone.

    “This role has been the best opportunity for me. It’s busy but so varied – no day is the same.”

    When asked what the hardest part of his job is: “Actually, I think it’s time. We need to give ourselves time and make time for ourselves. I think it’s the same for everyone and it’s always going to be an issue because there’s never enough hours in the day!”

    14 years ago, Jonny met his husband Ben through Facebook speed dating: “We love our holidays – we like to go on cruises and cottage holidays. With the pandemic I’ve not actually missed going abroad because I’ve now found that I prefer exploring here in the UK.”

    As well as his love for walking, which helps him relax: “I enjoy being outdoors. I have recently taken up running and wild water swimming, and I’m starting fell running soon.”

    Looking to the future Jonny shares his thoughts: “I want to be healthier. I saw myself a few years ago and I wasn’t unhealthy, but I wasn’t where I wanted to be, and I think with COVID now it’s important to have a healthy body and a healthy mind.”

  81. New studies in the Research and Innovation department

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    The following new studies are now open in Kingston Hospital’s Research and Innovation department:

    Poetic study (Pre-Operative Endocrine Therapy for Individualised Care with Abemaciclib):
    The main aim of this study is to determine the benefit of adding the drug ‘Abemaciclib’ to endocrine therapy in breast cancer patients who are exhibiting early evidence of sub-optimal endocrine responsiveness and a high risk of disease relapse.

    The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) is the study sponsor, with Professor Stephen Johnston as the Chief Investigator. The study is funded by Lilly and Cancer Research UK (via ICR Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit (ICR-CTSU) programme). ICR-CTSU is responsible for the central co-ordination of the trial, on behalf of the sponsor.

    COPE study (Carboprost or Oxytocin Postpartum haemorrhage Effectiveness):
    The COPE study aims to compare carboprost with oxytocin as initial treatments for women with clinically diagnosed Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) after giving birth in UK hospitals. The study will assess the relative cost-effectiveness of the use of carboprost and oxytocin as initial treatments for women with clinically diagnosed PPH and will explore the views of participants and their carers about their experiences of the two treatments and the consent process.

    The University of Liverpool is responsible for managing this study as the sponsor, with Prof Andrew Weeks as the Chief Investigator. The Liverpool Clinical Trials Centre has the overall management responsibility for the trial and responsibility for the co-ordination of centres. This study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) programme.

    Find out more about research at Kingston Hospital.

  82. A rollercoaster of mathematics, equations, compassion and kindness

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    From growing up in Singapore, to starting her doctor training in India, Archana joined Kingston Hospital eight months ago to continue her training. “I grew up in Singapore and moved to India when I was 17. I have always wanted to be a doctor. I’ve got quite a mixed global heritage, and I think that’s what attracted me to apply to London specifically because it’s quite a multicultural place and Kingston more so, I’d say.”

    In Singapore there are three main cultures – Chinese, Malays and Indians: “I have always felt very attached to my Indian roots, but yet exposed to a lot of different cultures from a young age and then I moved back to India. Both my parents are Indian.”

    As a young student growing up in multicultural Singapore, we asked Archana what inspired her to go into medicine: “My favourite subject growing up was mathematics – I absolutely loved it. When I looked at medicine as a career, I always liked the human aspect of it. I loved interacting with people from a young age. I love communicating and I felt that medicine gave me a good opportunity to tap into those interpersonal elements.”

    “I did my F1 and F2 equivalent years in India. I came here as a trust grade ST1 in medicine. I just knew that internal medicine was what I always wanted to do. It’s been a brilliant experience so far at Kingston, and I’d like to stay for as long as I can. Fingers crossed I get training here – I have to apply next month and then we’ll find out.”


    “I do get a bit emotionally invested sometimes but I’m only human. It can be a rollercoaster at times. I think the key is just to not bring it home with you too much, or just keep yourself occupied outside of work.”

    As well as going to the gym, Archana loves to dance: “I enjoy Indian dancing – I learnt the classical form – then I moved on to doing more semi-classical and contemporary dance. I also play the ukulele. I think anything related to dance and music is always something that’s an escape from reality for me. I’m transformed to a different world when I have time to get dressed in full Indian costume.”

    When asked the best part of her job as a doctor: “Honestly, I just love talking to people, hearing about different experiences of the patient, watching them get better, being there for them when they’re getting worse. That for me is the best part of my job. Unfortunately, a close relative passed away a couple of years ago and I realised then that nothing else really matters more than the human relations when caring for someone unwell – everything else takes a back seat.”

    Looking to the future Archana shares her aspirations: “I want to be a cardiologist. I feel passionately about that – it would be a dream come true if that does happen. I love mathematics and I love equations. For me when I look at ECGs or the physiology of the heart, it’s like a mathematical equation that we have to solve, and I would love to spend the rest of my life doing that.”

    “So, what keeps me going? It’s the process of continuously learning something new, and interacting with such a wide variety of people, not just patients, but staff, and the social element, as well as the educational element – all of it put together – it’s the most wonderful profession.”

    “Everyone has a different role in the team and every patient has a different story. It’s fascinating to see it all come together to deliver something amazing. To get that patient home and well and the impact that has on their family too. The gratitude you receive from a patient who is unwell, and they get better is immensely rewarding. The thank yous from the patients and their families really make my day.”

  83. Your NHS is here for you

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    It’s important to know where to go if you need medical advice. Please use the information below to help us to help you.


  84. Have your say on Kingston’s refreshed Health and Care Plan

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    The refreshed draft of the Kingston Health and Care Plan 2022-2024 has been published, describing the vision, priorities, and the actions we will work on together as partners to improve the health and wellbeing of Kingston’s residents.

    The plan was first published in 2019 with the aim of key organisations working together on priorities that would make the difference in enabling Kingston residents to start life well as children, live well as adults and for older people to age well for longer.

    The new two-year plan for 2022-2024 is a refresh of some of the existing priorities with a new focus on tackling health inequalities across the life course, tackling obesity, improving mental health and improving the lives of carers.

    Before the final plan is published later this year, you are invited to share your views. You can have your say by reading the plan and completing the survey by Tuesday 30 Novemberkingstonletstalk.co.uk/health-and-care-plan

    If you have any issues taking part, or need any of the information available in an alternative format, please get in touch via phone: 020 4526 2722 or email kingstonccg.engage@swlondon.nhs.uk

  85. Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs appointed Chair in Common at HRCH and Kingston Hospital

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    We are pleased to announce the appointment of Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs as Chair in Common of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust and Kington Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, from 1 April 2022.

    Sukhvinder will take over the reins from Sian Bates, whose term as Chairman comes to an end on 31 March 2022.

    This appointment will further support the work HRCH and Kingston Hospital teams are doing together to improve health services for the people of Hounslow, Kingston and Richmond.

    Sukhvinder is currently Vice Chair at Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust and Chair of the Thames Water Customer Challenge.

    She is also an accomplished CEO having led two high profile organisations (Barrow Cadbury and Runnymede Trust), through major change programmes and onto success in influencing government policies on inclusion, diversity and social justice. 

    Sir David Sloman, Regional Director for the NHS in London said:  “Sian’s contribution has been significant; providing excellent leadership as Chair of Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust for a fantastic eight years and more recently as Chair of Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust, enabling closer team work which has improved care for local people.   

    “Sukhvinder brings a wealth of experience in healthcare and I welcome her as Chair in Common, as we move towards even more collaborative ways of working to deliver the best care for patients in South and North West London.”  

    Sukhvinder Kaur-Stubbs said“I am delighted to have been appointed as Chair in Common of the Trusts and I really look forward to working with the teams to build on the well-established collaborative working arrangements already in place.

    “I’ve been really impressed by everything I have heard from the staff, patients and volunteers that I’ve met so far from both of the Trusts and I know from the conversations I’ve had already that there is a real opportunity for us to keep working to join up local health and social care for residents.

    “I’m very much looking forward to joining the Trusts next year and to working in partnership with the staff and all of the stakeholders to support the delivery of outstanding care and address emerging inequalities.”

    Jo Farrar, Chief Executive of Kingston Hospital and Interim Chief Executive of HRCH added: “I’d like to welcome Sukhvinder to the Boards of both Trusts and to congratulate her on her appointment. It’s a really exciting time to join HRCH and Kingston Hospital and I’m sure that Sukhvinder will enjoy working with us and leading our organisations through times of change.

    “I’d like to thank colleagues from NHSEI for their support in our Chair recruitment, along with the many partners from SW, and NW London who supported us with the Chair recruitment and to the Foundation Trust Governing Body for the important role they have played too.

    “We have a lot to do in the months and years ahead and I really look forward to working with Sukhvinder in 2022 and beyond.”

  86. Young fundraiser inspires Pampers donation to Kingston Hospital’s Neonatal Unit

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    Kingston Hospital’s Neonatal Unit has received the generous gift of a recliner chair from Pampers, in partnership with Bliss charity. The chair is especially intended to provide parents with a comfortable place to bond with their premature babies and has been frequently utilised since its arrival.

    During the early development of babies, touch is vital and contributes to the regulation of the infant’s heartbeat, improves their sleep quality, and helps them connect with the world around them. Kingston Hospital is committed to ensuring that parents are offered the space and facilities to bond with their babies, where appropriate, and therefore the recliner chair has been a wonderful addition to the Neonatal Unit.

    Eight-year-old Dhillon Manku, a young ambassador for the ‘Pampers for Preemies’ campaign, inspired Pampers to donate the special chair, as he was born prematurely at Kingston Hospital and was cared for on the Neonatal Unit. Dhillon began fundraising to help premature babies at the age of four and has so far raised an impressive £21,000.

    Matron Marie Richter said, “We want to give a big thank you to Pampers for donating this reclining chair to the Neonatal Unit. It has been in constant use since its arrival, giving parents a comfortable place to give skin to skin contact, or to hold their premature infant. It makes such a difference. Also, thank you to Dhillon who is an amazing fundraiser with a passion for helping to raise money to help premature infants.”

  87. Have your say on Richmond’s refreshed Health and Care Plan

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    The refreshed draft of the Richmond Health and Care Plan 2022-2024 has been published, describing the vision, priorities, and the actions we will work on together as partners to improve the health and wellbeing of Richmond’s residents.

    The plan was first published in 2019 with the aim of key organisations working together on priorities that would make the difference in enabling Richmond residents to start life well as children, live well as adults and for older people to age well for longer.

    The new two-year plan for 2022-2024 is a refresh of some of the existing priorities with a new focus on tackling health inequalities across the life course, tackling obesity, improving mental health and improving the lives of carers.

    Before the final plan is published later this year, you are invited to share your views. Your feedback will be used to inform the final Health and Care Plan, before it is approved by Richmond’s Health and Wellbeing Board in January 2022.

    You can have your say by reading the plan and completing the survey Richmond Health and Care Plan Refresh Survey – Have your say – Citizen Space

    The closing date for the survey is 10 December.

    If you would like more information or a hard copy of the survey please contact us at  richmondccg.involve@swlondon.nhs.uk  or on 020 4526 2722.

  88. Matron at the heart of our hospital

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    Diane Taboada came to the UK from The Philippines in 2000 and started working at Kingston Hospital. Twenty one years later Diane is now Matron for Cardiology, Gastroenterology and Respiratory, looking after Bronte, Hamble, and Hardy wards.

    Of the 15 years Diane worked on Bronte Ward, she says: “My first love has always been cardiology. What I most love about my job is developing staff and seeing them progress in their careers.”

    “I also like when I interact with patients, not only when they have complaints or when they have issues, as often patients and relatives will see me on the ward and want to give compliments about my staff. That makes me happy.  I make sure that I feed back to staff and thank them after a hard day, because it’s not easy right now in the NHS. It is also important to make sure that staff feel supported and valued because otherwise they will lose the motivation to come to work.”

    When asked how her role facilitates the wards to deliver high quality care she explains: “I do set high standards. First thing in the morning I do my rounds and in that quick round, I talk with the nurse in charge as to what their day would be like, not only about the discharges, but if they have any concerns about patients or relatives.  I then review their KPIs. I also have one-to-ones with the Band 7s of the wards. We look into the Friends and Family tests as well to look to how we can improve the patient experience.”

    As matron, Diane tells us how role modelling plays an important part in her role:  “During the first surge of the pandemic, it was scary, and it was the first time we had CPAP. So every day I went onto the ward to show staff it was okay to go onto the ward and care for our patients with COVID-19 and they shouldn’t be scared as I’m there with them.”

    We asked Diane, if she thinks coming through the last 18 months has made her a stronger person? She pauses. “Yes, I think so, it’s made me think that there’s not much that we cannot achieve if we put our minds to it. There has always been a very can-do attitude here at Kingston. When people pull together and we make sure we all feel supported, then we can get through it.”

    When asked why she has stayed at Kingston, Diane says: “My work family is like my second family. So the teams are like a second family to me. I have a good working relationship with the teams.  I also had staff who stayed with me for 15 years. They always say employees do not leave jobs. They leave their bosses. So, I must have been taken care of well by my bosses!”

    How does Diane relax? “I run, well, I used to run, but it has been so busy. I haven’t been running for a month now but starting again tomorrow! I enjoy going out with my friends. Filipinos have, as I always joke, four stomachs. As long as we have food, we’ll be fine.”

    “I’m still in touch with my nursing cohort of 2000. In October we went on a spa break to celebrate our birthdays for the last 2 years as we were not able to meet as a group due to COVID. There’s five or six of us still working in the trust.”

    When asked what inspires her, Diane explains: “Making a positive difference to our staff and patients’ lives is what makes it worthwhile to come to work, despite all the stresses.  Like I said, Kingston is my second family where else would I want to work?”

  89. Pancreatic Awareness month

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    Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed late. Nearly 50% of diagnoses are made via an emergency presentation and 88% of those diagnosed via this route will die within one year. Survival is 3 times higher for patients diagnosed via GP referral.

     Risk factors:

    • Age
    • Smoking
    • Being overweight
    • Chronic pancreatitis
    • Diabetes

    Symptoms

    The symptoms of pancreatic cancer can be vague and varied and can include:

    • indigestion,
    •  abdominal pain and/or back pain,
    • unexplained weight loss, nausea,
    • loss of appetite, fatigue
    • , new onset diabetes,
    • or a change in existing diabetes and changes in bowel habit (both constipation or diarrhoea).
    • Jaundice

    More information can be found on:

      Macmillan.org .uk

    www.nhs.uk/conditions/pancreatic-cancer

    https://www.pcrf.org.uk/pancreatic-cancer-research

  90. An interview with Catherine Broomfield, Emergency Department volunteer

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    In August, we welcomed new volunteer Catherine Broomfield to Emergency Department volunteering. In the following interview, Catherine explains her unique journey from a career in aviation cabin crew to volunteering at Kingston Hospital.

    What has your career been to date?
    I started working in the city as a secretary on a trading floor for 10 years. I then moved to France where I started working as an English teacher and ended up working for a company of international wealth managers as a Sales Assistant and Translator.  After 14 years in France, I returned to the UK and ventured into the world of air travel. Firstly, I worked as Cabin Crew for British Airways and then as an International Airline Concierge for Air New Zealand on the LA route. I then applied to Virgin Atlantic as I wanted to go to lots of different destinations. I have been working for Virgin as cabin crew since 2016.

    How do you think your Virgin Atlantic experience has influenced your approach to volunteering?
    When you work in customer service you can’t be someone who holds back. I’m used to dealing with difficult situations and I wanted to show my gratitude after surviving a very challenging 18 months during the pandemic. My way of doing that was to explore volunteering for the NHS. The advert for Emergency Department volunteering on NHS Jobs immediately attracted me as I had started working in the NHS during COVID, when the aviation industry ground to a halt. I trained to become a Blood Donor Carer with NHS Blood and Transplant, which enabled me to learn a new skill, do something useful and keep a roof over my head.

    What is the most rewarding part of ED volunteering?
    The ED environment suits me as I am someone who likes to keep busy and be in an ever-changing environment. You have to be very proactive, motivated and able to talk to anyone. I have found it really makes a difference as people want to talk and for you to listen, especially if they’ve been in the department for a while. Nowadays, we have technology at our fingertips to keep us entertained and constantly in touch with friends and family. However, many older people are not glued to their phones, if they have one, and just want someone to chat to. They really appreciate a cup of tea or coffee (where appropriate) or someone who can run and fetch them a newspaper to read. Volunteering also helps the medical staff as I can run around and help with the basics, such as popping to Boots to get a prescription, showing someone where to get a scan done, or simply dealing with the laundry.

    Would you recommend ED volunteering to others?
    Yes, definitely. I’ve already recommended it to a colleague at Virgin Atlantic. The past year has taught me the importance of getting out of the house and keeping busy – find what you enjoy and don’t be frightened! There are lots of ways to pay things back in society – volunteering at Kingston Hospital is the way that I wanted to do it.

    To register your interest as an Emergency Department volunteer or find out more about the programme of volunteering offered at Kingston Hospital, please email khft.volunteering@nhs.net or call us on 0208 934 3620.

  91. Research team thanked for “outstanding” personal contributions to GenOMICC Study

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    Rita Fernandes, Rosaleen Herdman-Grant, Richard Simms and Dr Anna Joseph from the Kingston Hospital Research team have been thanked by GenOMICC’s Chief Investigator Dr Kenneth Baillie, for their “outstanding” personal contributions to the GenOMICC study.

    GenOMICC is a global research study that aims to discover specific genes that control the processes that lead to life-threatening illness. Once these processes are understood, there is potential to design effective treatments for infections, including COVID.

    Dr Baillie thanked each member of the team personally for their “consistent, fastidious, and diligent contributions to making this study happen” and acknowledged the difficult circumstances faced by the team, who tirelessly continued their screening and recruitment of patients, regardless of the obstacles created by COVID. Despite the challenges posed by the pandemic, the team have succeeded in recruiting over 200 patients in the last 18 months, and Kingston Hospital has consistently been placed within the top 10 recruiting sites for the study.

    GenOMICC is the largest consented research study in the history of UK critical care medicine, leads the world in genetic discovery in COVID, and has so far found 25 genetic associations with critical illness. It has already informed the selection of drugs in large scale clinical trials and continues to find new insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease. Dr Baillie highlighted his confidence that, with the help of Kingston Hospital’s research team, there is potential to use these insights to combat critical illness syndromes such as sepsis and influenza over the coming years. Congratulations to the team on their efforts and outstanding contribution to this significant international and world renowned research.

  92. Our Emergency (A&E) Department is currently very busy

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    Our Emergency (A&E) Department is currently very busy. If you think you need to come to A&E, contact NHS 111 first and avoid busy waiting rooms by booking an appointment.

    Go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111 for free from a landline or mobile phone.

    If it’s an emergency and you do need to come in, we are working really hard, so please be kind to our staff.

    Alternatively, if you’re in the Teddington area and need urgent care you may be seen more quickly in Teddington Urgent Treatment Centre – open until 8pm. Find out more about Teddington Urgent Treatment Centre.

  93. Pulse check: Services for people with diabetes

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    Throughout October and November, Healthwatch Kingston is working with Diabetes UK to talk to residents living with diabetes (including family and friends, carers and advocates) about their experiences of services. Share your views here and help improve services.

  94. New volunteering programme helps elderly patients stay safe following hospital discharge

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    A new volunteering programme, which aims to help prevent falls among elderly patients at home, launched in October. 

    The “Falls Prevention – Community Exercise Volunteers” programme, which is run by the volunteering service at Kingston Hospital and supported by Helpforce charity, sees volunteers providing one-to-one support to encourage patients to complete exercises at home. This new volunteering programme will help ensure patients receive the right support at home and reduce the risk of being re-admitted due to falls.

    It is estimated that about 40% of older adults fall within six months of discharge, with 50% of these incidents resulting in injury (Said et al. 2016). It is widely recognised that exercises focused on improving strength and balance can reduce risk of falls and research indicates that a tailored exercise programme can reduce falls by as much as 54% (NICE, 2018).

    Volunteers will support patients to undertake a physiotherapy prescribed exercise programme at home after being discharged from hospital, with the aim of improving strength, mobility and balance, and in turn reducing the risk of falls, as well as restoring wellbeing and independence for patients.

    Nic Kane, Chief Nurse for Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust, said: “I am delighted to support this piece of work, which is a fantastic example of collaborative working between community trusts, acute hospitals and the voluntary sector. Thank you to everyone involved in this project, which will make a real difference to patients.”

    Volunteers who take part in this programme will visit patients at their home once a week for a duration of eight weeks, to demonstrate the exercises and provide encouragement.

    Find out more about volunteering at Kingston Hospital.

  95. My experience as a COVID-19 vaccinator

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    Caroline Ellis, a Senior Practice Development Nurse at Kingston Hospital, works in the Practice Development Team, providing education and support to registered nurses, nursing associates and nursing assistants. Here, she shares how her role at the hospital was transformed due to the pandemic and her experience of being redeployed as a COVID-19 vaccinator.

    “The main thing I remember feeling back at the start of the pandemic was a great deal of uncertainty about what was to come. Would the team be redeployed? If so, to where? It felt strange to still be heading in to work every morning, while the rest of the world scrambled to work remotely or was furloughed.

    “Soon we had some clarity that our team would remain in a support capacity, ensuring that redeployed staff from specialist areas had the skills to care for patients in ward environments. My lasting feeling from these months is pride: pride in a team that very swiftly developed new ways of working. Throughout this period a vaccine was the Holy Grail. When we were asked to help with the vaccination programme, it felt momentous, although like with anything new, there was an element of apprehension.

    “The Practice Development Team ran the patient vaccination programme out of the Day Surgery Unit. Like any new service (especially one put together at short notice) there were challenges to overcome – not least in running a drop-in clinic while trying to maintain social distancing. Luckily, as we were already a close-knit team, we knew each other’s strengths and weaknesses. The whole process brought home to me how well the organisation can work together.

    “I think what struck me most about the experience, was how isolated many of our patients had become during the pandemic. Many had barely seen family and friends for nine months; some were struggling to come to terms with life-changing diagnoses while being cut off from their usual sources of support. For some, sitting down in the vaccination room was when they really began to process news they had been given earlier in the day.

    “When we revived the clinic for second doses three-months later, it was lovely to see people again. Overall, the vaccination programme was something really special to be involved in. In those early days, when COVID vaccines were only just beginning to be rolled out, people were so thankful to be offered a vaccine, and the vaccine offered the first glimmer of hope that life would begin to return to normal.”

  96. CQC publish National Inpatient Survey results

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    The National Inpatient Survey takes place every year and we are grateful to over 400 patients that have taken time to complete the most recent survey, the results of which have been published by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) this week. 

    Summary of results:

    The CQC report benchmarks Kingston Hospital against other Trusts and you can read the full report on the NHS surveys website: All Files – NHS Surveys

    (You will need to scroll down the alphabetical list of NHS Trusts).

    Commenting on the National Inpatient Survey results, Chief Nurse, Nic Kane, said: “Kingston Hospital’s commitment to patient care is demonstrated in these survey findings and we are delighted to see improvements in some of the areas that we know matter most to patients.  Our pledge to patients, families and carers over the coming months is to listen to their views on how we can improve in areas where we have done less well and support staff to work together to make change happen.”

  97. Kingston Hospital cancer specialists promote breast cancer awareness on Wear it Pink Day

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    Kingston Hospital cancer specialists, Michelle Harris (Breast Care Nurse) and Archana Sood (Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Manager) were based in John Lewis Kingston’s lingerie department on Friday 22 October, in support of Wear it Pink Day for Breast Cancer Awareness. Michelle and Archana were available to promote breast health awareness, offer literature and to answer any questions or concerns women had in relation to breast cancer. They were joined by Anjali Dargan, John Lewis’ specialist bra fitter, who has expertise in specialist bras for women having breast cancer surgery.

    Michelle felt that the session was extremely valuable as “breast cancer is an extremely sensitive and emotive subject, and so being here to answer questions and offer emotional support to women who are afraid was invaluable today.” Offering a safe and neutral space meant that women felt comfortable to discuss concerns that otherwise might not have been addressed. Archana found that “it was great to have the opportunity to talk to women about checking their breasts for any unusual symptoms and to promote breast health in general. It was particularly heart-warming for me as I met two of our patients who themselves had been through the breast cancer journey at Kingston Hospital. They were delighted to see breast cancer awareness being promoted in a public setting.”

    You can find information and support relating to breast cancer here.

  98. Kingston Hospital’s Resuscitation team teaches life-saving first aid at Waterloo station

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    Therese Sidney, Richard Sandham, Hannah Choules, Jemima Tyrell, and Camilla Bediones, from Kingston Hospital’s Resuscitation team, headed to Waterloo station on Saturday 16 October to support Restart a Heart Day. Each year, in October, the Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) promote the Restart a Heart initiative which encourages the teaching of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to the public. Ensuring that as many people as possible are trained in CPR is extremely valuable; out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have a less than one in ten survival rate in the UK, and it’s therefore vital for the public to be educated regarding which steps to take if someone collapses and stops breathing normally. Kingston Hospital’s Resuscitation team were able to offer the general public passing through Waterloo station the opportunity to learn how to give hands-only CPR (in line with government social distancing guidance) and how to use a defibrillator. The team were supported by the British Heart Foundation and Dr Marion Norbrook, whose father survived a cardiac arrest at Waterloo station some years ago.

    Therese Sidney, Resuscitation/Simulation Lead said: “We haven’t been able to engage in-person with the public on Restart a Heart Day for the past 2 years due to COVID-19, as restrictions have been eased, my team and I were very keen to resume this again. We were well received by the Waterloo station staff and soon we were teaching a variety of commuters how to perform CPR. The feedback we received was so positive and encouraging, people were genuinely keen to learn and practice this life skill. We really enjoyed it and look forward to a bigger collaboration with London Ambulance Service and others next year.”

    You can watch the RCUK’s short animation video CPR Right Now, which  demonstrates the steps to save a life, while reducing the risk of COVID-19 transmission.


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